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Gottagetthrough posted 6/18/2013 20:05 PM

Anyone know about colorblindness

My dad is color blind, and so is my husband. My preschool son is showing signs... He is interested in colors, but only knows orange

Is there a type of colorblindness where you can see orange? I think red green color blind you can not see orange??

Catwoman posted 6/18/2013 20:09 PM

My dad is colorblind. He is typical in that reds and greens are the most problematic for him. I am not sure about orange--you should probably speak to your son's pediatrician. Fortunately, it isn't terribly debilitating and really only eliminates careers in printing or graphics.

Dad is colorblind, but I work in the printing and graphics business and I have tested and been found to have extremely good color perception.

Cat

Mama_of_3_Kids posted 6/18/2013 20:23 PM

I have one son who is red-green color blind and it doesn't hinder him in any way. We have informed teachers so they don't think there is something "wrong" with him, rather it's just that he is color blind He can see every other color (mostly) okay...red and green are usually only a problem when they're side-by-side (he can usually distinguish when they're separate). There are tests for it, but it can be difficult to test at a young age.

hexed posted 6/18/2013 23:46 PM

If your father is color blind your son is most likely color blind. It is a genetic trait that is passed from maternal grandfather to grandson. Women are very seldom color blind.

degree of colorblindness can vary. My uncle sees only in black and white. My dad is red/green in one eye and pastel in the other and only sees blues correctly. It affects everyone differently. It is entirely possible that orange is a 'good' color for him. Be prepared for him to identify colors based on the 'under tones' My son struggles with purples with lots of red in them for example. Those appear blue to him.

My son is dramatically red/green color blind. He really doesn't see any colors correctly. Let your son's teachers know at the beginning of each year so they are prepared for some odd art projects, wrong answers to color related questions/problems but other than that...not really an academic issue.

My son had a gameboy in grade school. He was constantly asking me if it was charged or not. Used to drive me nuts until I realized the indicator light was a red/green LED light. Poor kid had NO idea what color it was!

[This message edited by hexed at 11:48 PM, June 18th (Tuesday)]

Gottagetthrough posted 6/19/2013 07:18 AM

Yeah, its so strange, he's known orange since he was about 18 mos, but every other color is an 'ummm... I don't know, what color is it?'

He tells me, orange is my favorite color because I know it

Very interesting, I thought color blind just meant you can't see red and green... It looks like there are lots of variations!

Gottagetthrough posted 6/19/2013 07:21 AM

Hexed that's so interesting that ur uncle can only see b/w... I asked our pediatric eye Dr ( my oldest has glasses) if the baby could be 100% colorblind. He said in 50 years of being an eye Dr he'd seen that once!

Genetics is so interesting!

[This message edited by Gottagetthrough at 7:22 AM, June 19th (Wednesday)]

metamorphisis posted 6/19/2013 08:04 AM

I don't know for sure if my husband is colour blind but we lived in a house with navy blue cedar shingles for a few years and he would call them grey. Over and over. They were blue!!!
He seems to have trouble in that blue/grey/purple range. My son seems similar in that once in awhile he'll be describing something and he gets the colour wrong. Usually in that blue/green range. It's subtle enough that I've never really looked into though.

JanaGreen posted 6/19/2013 08:07 AM

I think there can be any number of variations of colorblindness. My husband and my nephew have an odd colorblindness - it's like they can see the different colors for the most part (i.e., he would never wear two socks that were different colors) but they cannot label what color they are seeing. He gets odd colors mixed up, like blue and pink, and anything that's a muddy/brownish tone (like maroon or an olive green) he's hopelessly lost.

I think it's fascinating.

tushnurse posted 6/19/2013 08:44 AM

My Grandpa was color blind, and when my mom tried to teach me my colors she thought I was too, turns out I was just a spaz. The ADHD was the issue.

That being said, you should tell your pediatrician, and have him tested, they have neat little tests with different colors and a picture of something within it. Colorblind folks can't see them because all the dots of color look the same. At the end of the day it doesn't really matter, but it's good to know so you know it's not a learning issue. Like this spaz!

hexed posted 6/19/2013 14:18 PM

I think there can be any number of variations of colorblindness. My husband and my nephew have an odd colorblindness - it's like they can see the different colors for the most part (i.e., he would never wear two socks that were different colors) but they cannot label what color they are seeing. He gets odd colors mixed up, like blue and pink, and anything that's a muddy/brownish tone (like maroon or an olive green) he's hopelessly lost.

This is pretty common actually. Colorblind people can often identify colors as being different from one another. My son often identifies pink with blue. If there is a lot of blue undertone in the pink he sees it as blue b/c he wouldn't see the red in it at all.

My dad almost flunked kindergarten b/c he couldn't learn his colors.

dreamlife posted 6/19/2013 15:17 PM

My father was red/green colorblind and I passed it on to my son *genetically* -- he colored the most awesome purple trees, etc.

I am fine.

wheelsup posted 6/19/2013 16:55 PM

Hi!

Yes, I think there's an orange/brown type of color-blindness.

My son is color blind - I think the orange/brown. It was 'funny' because the kindergarten teachers kept sending him home with stuff that he could practice colors with. When the pediatrician caught the color-blindness on a screening test, I sent a note to the school. They felt horrible!!! But, at least we knew what was going on. :)

The next two years (he's now 7 and just finished second grade) I had to send a note to the teacher that my son is color-blind ... please don't think he can't do math because he colors the picture wrong! So much of elementary school is based on colors ...

woundedwidow posted 6/20/2013 07:13 AM

My first husband was VERY red/green colorblind. It made riding with him a real challenge.

amitheow posted 6/20/2013 10:54 AM

My H is colorblind.
It makes decorating a breeze. I do what I want he has no idea what is what.

Only we did have an argument once when I told him to grab the blue comforter and he told me it was black. I said this is BLUE. then I held it up to a black piece of furntiure to compare and he said yeah, both black.

ARG!!!!

JanaGreen posted 6/20/2013 11:27 AM

If there is a lot of blue undertone in the pink he sees it as blue b/c he wouldn't see the red in it at all.

Ahhhh interesting!

Snapdragon posted 6/20/2013 11:36 AM

I had a bit of a debate once with the BIG boss of my institution. I had created a graph for him for a presentation. He kept telling me he couldn't tell the difference between various elements. We went round and round as I changed things... still no good... change again... still no good.

Finally he told me he was red/green color blind! Oh fer sakes!!!

For 5 years I worked for an ophthalmologist and regularly did the screening for colors. So many people were amazed to find out they had some issues. It helped them to explain a lot.

looking forward posted 6/21/2013 18:50 PM

My youngest son is red/green colour blind. He inherited it from me; it's a maternal source.

Quote:
Red/green colour blindness is a common hereditary condition which means it is usually passed down from your parents.
Colour blindness is usually passed from mother to son on the 23rd chromosome, which is the sex chromosome.
The X chromosome is the sex chromosome: males have an X chromosome and a Y chromosome and females have two X chromosomes. For a male to be colour blind the faulty colour blindness gene only has to appear on his X chromosome. For a female to be colour blind it must be present on both of her X chromosomes. This is why red/green colour blindness is far more common in men than women. Blue colour blindness affects both men and women equally, because it is carried on a non-sex chromosome.

Most colour blind people are able to see things as clearly as other people but they unable to fully ‘see’ red, green or blue light. There are different types of colour blindness and there are extremely rare cases where people are unable to see any colour at all.

The most common form of colour blindness is known as red/green colour blindness and most colour blind people suffer from this. Although known as red/green colour blindness this does not mean sufferers mix up red and green, it means they mix up all colours which have some red or green as part of the whole colour. For example, a red/green colour blind person will confuse a blue and a purple because they can’t ‘see’ the red element of the colour purple.

Source: http://www.colourblindawareness.org/

[This message edited by looking forward at 6:52 PM, June 21st (Friday)]

143ANF posted 6/21/2013 22:57 PM

My father is color deficient with green/red.
My daughter's father is color deficient with red/green.
My daughter is color deficient with brown/orange. The opthamologist hadn't seen that in a female before my daughter.

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