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Should I toss my hat in the ring?

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traicionada posted 5/28/2014 22:16 PM

I have been working in community health since 2000 & most days I love my job as Access Manager but last week I was approached by the CEO and asked if I was interested in the COO vacancy which becomes available June 1
In the 42+ years of the organization, we have had 2 COOs: my former boss who was asked to resign because he got allegedly involved with one of the eligibility workers & my current boss who didn't last 1 year of the job because she was highly incompetent & put us almost 1 million on the red
Should I toss my hat in the ring?

MovingUpward posted 5/28/2014 22:21 PM

Wow COO why not?

LosferWords posted 5/28/2014 23:38 PM

I'd say go for it.

ThoughtIKnewYa posted 5/29/2014 00:01 AM

Absolutely!

Good luck!

woundedby2 posted 5/29/2014 00:41 AM

Gosh, yes, go for it!

Sad in AZ posted 5/29/2014 02:23 AM

Think about this:
In how bad shape is the place?
Will you be expected to pull them out of the tailspin?
Can you pull them out of the tailspin?
Could you be made a scapegoat if the place is in dire shape?

I'm not saying you're not COO material. I'm being realistic.

karmahappens posted 5/29/2014 05:39 AM

My mind went to the same thoughts as sad.....

Are you qualified for the job? Can you clean up this mess and will you be given the freedom to really do it?

I hate seeing ulterior motives of the higher ups but it happens so often , a fresh new person becomes the fall guy so others can keep their hands clean.

Think about it and see what vibes you are getting wrt fixing the mess left behind.

It doesn't hurt to send the resume in....

sadcat posted 5/29/2014 07:18 AM

You are an incredibly bright and capable woman.

If you want it then go for it. Consider what the others have said- really look at yourself and what you need and want.

Do not sell yourself short. You obviously have the respect of the CEO. There is a reason for that!

Amazonia posted 5/29/2014 07:30 AM

In how bad shape is the place?
Will you be expected to pull them out of the tailspin?
Can you pull them out of the tailspin?
Could you be made a scapegoat if the place is in dire shape?

^^^This. I wondered all the same things, because this is exactly what I saw happen at my last job, the house of horrors. (3 CEOs in 3 years, and every single one threw the COO under the bus as a scapegoat).

What's wrong with the place, why is the COO position so f'd up, and do you think you're the right person to fix it? Do you have the staff support and rapport that you need to succeed in this job?

ETA: Oh, and do you want the added responsibility? Is it worth the pay bump?

[This message edited by Amazonia at 7:31 AM, May 29th (Thursday)]

Schadenfreude posted 5/29/2014 07:34 AM

First question. Do you have a plan to steer the Titanic away from the iceberg?

Do you know the difference between strategy and tactics? Strategy is essentially the goal,of where you/the organization needs to be. Tactics is how you get there.

Are you tough enough to clean house as necessary? You may already know who the dead wood is, and if an infidelity survivor you know the should X go or stay is not always an easy decision.

Will you have authority to do what you think needs to be done? Obviously, your predecessor left a huge mess behind and the bosses want someone to clean it up. But they have to be with your program or it is doomed to fail.

At that level in the business world, you'd probably get a contract and not just the typical " at will" employment agreement. That way there is a cost to the organization should some board members nephew need the position and the board needs to discharge you.

It's a different world up there --more responsibility and more accountability. Are you ready for it?

Finally, as others have commented in different ways, is this offer a Trojan Horse? What's the story behind the hiring/promotion of the current COO? Why are you the one currently being considered? You have probably read press releases of high company officials resigning to pursue other interests followed by another press release that the organization hired Y to take the organization in another direction.

P.S. Are you prepared to wade through reams of bureaucratic regulations as part of your job duties? You'll find that your new role is quite removed from helping people.

[This message edited by Schadenfreude at 7:36 AM, May 29th (Thursday)]

FaithFool posted 5/29/2014 08:01 AM

I love my job as Access Manager

This says it all.

TrustedHer posted 5/29/2014 08:01 AM

In the worst case, you do the job for a year and get thrown under the bus.

What does COO look like on your resume if you have to go job hunting in a year? Does it improve it?

Are you prepared for that in case it happens? Have enough savings to survive a job hunt?

I'm pretty sure with your skills you wouldn't be out of work long, and once you've been in an executive position like that you would be eligible to apply for a wider range of new work. Everything from direct patient care to the executive suite.

I'd probably go for it.

tushnurse posted 5/29/2014 09:06 AM

Think about this:
In how bad shape is the place?
Will you be expected to pull them out of the tailspin?
Can you pull them out of the tailspin?
Could you be made a scapegoat if the place is in dire shape?
I'm not saying you're not COO material. I'm being realistic.

NPR actually did a report on the Glass Cliff last week. Stating that women and minorities are often placed in positions of leadership as the scapegoat, or to fix what was broken.

I am NOT stating this is what your situation is. Just something to consider.

I also have worked as a boss, and as a worker bee, and at this point in my life I love what I do, make a fair salary (sure I'd like to make more, who doesn't), and have a lot of flexibility. I don't have any desire to do more than that at this point. I would hate giving up my patient contact, and one on one relationships I have.

Realize that going into a leadership position means longer (usually lots initially) hours, being available at all hours as an Operations manager working in a 24/7 field, and no one to cover you when you do take time off.

If you want it go for it.
If you are happy and content right now, then stop and really think about it before stepping forward.

Congrats though. This says a LOT about the kind of work you do, and the person you are to be personally asked to take the position.

traicionada posted 5/29/2014 14:21 PM

When the first COO was asked to resign, I assumed a lot his responsibilities and yes it was crazy at first but not a deal breaker. I was even part of panel who interviewed the second one leaving now. Needless to say, I didn't choose her then but the CEO used her executive power and hired her anyway (they worked together at county before).
Since I'm sitting on the fence, I talked to the CMO last Saturday (she's awesome & trustworthy), reviewed financials with CFO this morning (we were scheduled to meet already) and in theory we could turn things around within 3 months easy so my biggest fear comes from the fact that I will be the first COO without a MBA. I know not totally unheard of but not what I had in mind. This job would be the natural progression in my career but I was thinking more 3 years from now (I'm applying for grad school in December but I'm going for a dual degree). I'll drive me nuts for people to assume that I got the job because I'm a women or because I'm brown or just because I'm young and dumb enough to take it. Ugh! I don't like feeling like stupid insecure kid but that's exactly how I feel

sisoon posted 5/29/2014 18:15 PM

I'll drive me nuts for people to assume that I got the job because I'm a women or because I'm brown or just because I'm young and dumb enough to take it.

Ignore that. Ignore the no MBA - that's crap. There are a bunch of ways you can learn to excel in the job, and a degree isn't one of them. The knowledge is worthwhile, but there are a bunch of ways to get the knowledge beside school.

If you want the job, think you can do it well (even - maybe that should be 'especially' - if you have to grow into it), and think you'll have the support, why not go for it?

Amazonia posted 5/29/2014 20:20 PM

As long as you can prove the doubters wrong, and if you have the support of the other execs (not just the CEO... for some reason I never trust CEOs), I think it might be worth trying, based on what you're saying.

Will you have the respect of your subordinates? Are you well liked internally? Is there someone who can promote into your current job so you don't get stuck pulling double duty?

And lastly, do you think they'll pay for your degree since it seems relevant to the job?

traicionada posted 6/21/2014 20:37 PM

I did it My interview is scheduled for Tuesday morning Wish me luck...

LosferWords posted 6/21/2014 20:43 PM

Best of luck! Sending lots of mojo...

And congrats on the interview!!

inconnu posted 6/21/2014 22:19 PM

you go! mojo, mojo, mojo!!!!

Amazonia posted 6/22/2014 07:58 AM


Mojo!!

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