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User Topic: The great gluten-free scam
HardenMyHeart
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Member # 15902
Default  Posted: 11:07 AM, November 7th (Thursday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

Interesting article discussing the rise of gluten-free products:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/healthyeating/10430422/The-great-gluten-free-scam.html


Me: BH, Her: FWW - Long Term EA/PA
d-day: June 25, 2007
Married 29 years, Happily Reconciled

Posts: 5613 | Registered: Aug 2007
tushnurse
♀ Member
Member # 21101
Default  Posted: 1:13 PM, November 7th (Thursday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

FINALLY!!!!!
Very few folks out there can't handle gluten. They have a specific disease. Celiac Sprue. Gluten when eatenin overabundance makes us fat sure, but so does anything if you eat more than you burn.

It certainly isn't worth spending all the extra money for the super expensive gluten free chips, bread, pasta, etc.


Me: FBS
Him: FWS
Kids: 14 & 16
Married for 21 years now, was 16 at the time. .
D-Day Sept 26 2008
Fully R'd, and Happy Happy Happy

Posts: 6549 | Registered: Oct 2008 | From: St. Louis
circe
♀ Member
Member # 6687
Default  Posted: 1:57 PM, November 7th (Thursday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

Well, the Telegraph is basically a tabloid and accordingly, this article is filled with a lot of completely wrong information, some of it just silly. I think if the take home message is to not eat refined flours, even those that substitute for wheat, then sure I'll buy that. To someone not sensitive to wheat, but who wants to lose weight, then using refined wheat substitutes isn't going to make a heck of a lot of difference.

On the other hand, many, MANY people do have celiac, and after a lifetime of not being able to go out to eat or grab a quick dinner when you're in a rush, the availability of gluten free menu items and fast-ish food is a recent godsend. So who cares if some people are eating it and don't need to? If it keeps it in the marketplace available to those who do need it, why should anyone care?

Our family makes a point of frequenting places that have reliable GF food because if they weren't offering it, two of my children would never get to eat out. I am grateful for the people who are wealthy enough to afford the expensive GF products, even if they don't medically need it, because their demand of it keeps those of us with a real medical need in a sea of choices. You have no idea what it was like 20 years ago, not being able to enjoy a simple restaurant, beer or prepared meal with a group of friends.

I'm not sure why people have such issues with the fact that it's offered. It's not like they've taken away other options to make room for it on the shelves.


Posts: 3130 | Registered: Mar 2005
brooke4
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Default  Posted: 5:30 AM, November 8th (Friday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

Well, the Telegraph is basically a tabloid and accordingly,

I haven't read the article, but I just want to say, that's not actually true. I live in the UK, and while I'm not a Telegraph reader because I don't agree with their editorial content, it's actually a very respected paper - not at all a tabloid.

My two cents - most people do feel better if they drastically cut down the amount of wheat they eat (particularly highly processed white flour), but unless you are truly celiac, the gluten free stuff doesn't make you feel so great either.

Having said above I don't read the Telegraph, I just realized that this was from there too, but interesting

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddrink/8572423/Does-sliced-bread-make-you-feel-bloated.html


Me: BS, 40, Him: WS 41
Married: 15 years
3 children
D-Day: 10/2005

Posts: 1481 | Registered: Feb 2007
million pieces
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Member # 27539
Default  Posted: 6:28 AM, November 8th (Friday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

Climbing on my soapbox

I am a dietitian, worked with peds for most of my career. So in a way, I am thrilled about the availability of GF for my patients. Thrilled. But I am 100% behind this article. I couldn't give a crap about what people want to waste their money on, but don't come into my hospital for conditions weight related and berate me because my hospital doesn't have enough GF options for you for your elective surgery. And don't tell me that I must not know what I'm talking about when I state the reason behind not having a lot of GF choices is $$ and the fact that only a small percentage of the population has celiac dz. And don't imply or state clearly that you know more about nutrition than me because your read a blog on the Paleo diet or saw something on Dr. Oz.

But this too shall pass like every other fad diet.


Me - 42
2 kids, 9 and 11
D-Day 2/5/10, separated 3 wks later
Divorced 11/15/11!!!!

Posts: 1146 | Registered: Feb 2010 | From: MD
tushnurse
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Member # 21101
Default  Posted: 7:31 AM, November 8th (Friday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

((((Million Pieces)))))

I feel the same way, and every time a patient starts a sentence with "I saw on Dr Oz...."
I know I have some work to do, to disclaim what he has said, and show them proof, and explain the science of why they are incorrect.

I wish the AMA or someone would force that clown off the air.

I also agree with exactly what you stated about GF, and the true need to follow it. I also love all the folks that are now claiming they have Celiac disease, because their IBS is better without gluten in their diet. However they have never had an endoscopy with biopsy to diagnose, and never had issues with anemia. Then I get to say, Um, no you may be sensitive to Gluten, but you are not a true Celiac patient.


Me: FBS
Him: FWS
Kids: 14 & 16
Married for 21 years now, was 16 at the time. .
D-Day Sept 26 2008
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Posts: 6549 | Registered: Oct 2008 | From: St. Louis
FaithFool
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Default  Posted: 8:26 AM, November 8th (Friday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

My heart goes out to celiac patients, it must not be any fun at all to have to navigate food.

As for the gluten thing, I think the elephant in the room is the genetic modification.

It amazes me that no-one is connecting the dots between food designed to destroy the digestive systems of insects and people who eat the food experiencing catastrophic failures of the gut.

As long as someone is making money, the absurd resistance to labelling will continue.


DDay: June 15, 2008
Mistakenly married Mr. Superfreak
20 years of OWs, WTF?
Divorced Dec 26, 2011
Celebrating 60 years on Earth

Posts: 16613 | Registered: Jul 2008 | From: Canada
NaiveAgain
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Member # 20849
Default  Posted: 9:11 AM, November 8th (Friday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

I think the elephant in the room is the genetic modification.
I totally agree. It is the hormones, the pesticides, and the genetically modified food they are trying to pass as "real food" that I feel is the biggest problem in most people's diet. We are meant to be eating food as close to its' natural form as possible.

Have you ever paid attention to what they pass off as a tomato in the supermarket? Drop one on the floor, it will bounce. Real tomatoes don't bounce. They squish. They pick the tomatoes while green (before it has had time to absorb the vitamims and minerals that our bodies need) and then they use a chemical process to turn them red.

As long as someone is making money, the absurd resistance to labelling will continue.
Yup. The food we eat has a lot more to do with which organization has the most lobbying money than whether it is good for you.


Original WS D-Day July 10, 2008. Kept lying, he is gone.
New WS (2 EA's, no PA) 12-3-13
If you don't like where you are, then change it. You are not a tree.

Posts: 14901 | Registered: Aug 2008 | From: Ohio
circe
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Member # 6687
Default  Posted: 1:32 PM, November 8th (Friday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

First, a lot of the information in the Telegraph article was simply false. And the article itself was an opinion piece, not a factual information piece. CNN writes similar tabloidesque articles.

It amazes me that no-one is connecting the dots between food designed to destroy the digestive systems of insects and people who eat the food experiencing catastrophic failures of the gut.

Because there's actual scientific research about this, and the facts - the real data, not the emotional knee-jerk responses, but the actual epidemiological data - doesn't support this. There is a TON of research on the diets of those countries in which IBS, Crohn's, ulcerative colitis or other generalized autoimmune gut problems, and those without. There are real reasons behind the patterns. There is data to support it. It's actually very interesting, and has a lot to do with the changes in the general physical health of the population as development and health care improves in their community.

Also, from the outside it may seem that only a small amount of the population has been diagnosed with celiac, but as the tests get easier and more common, more demographic groups of people are being discovered to have been suffering from celiac without having attributed their sometimes lifelong issues to celiac. For instance certain elderly age groups are seeing an upward trend in celiac diagnoses. Previously doctors wouldn't have tested elderly patients for celiac, either for practical reasons or because they reasoned that severe celiac issues would have been diagnosed well before. Yet as they learn the myriad ways the body can respond to the disease, and as the scientific literature accumulates data about celiac diagnosis in the elderly, it's a more common course of action to just test for it, and the numbers (and percent of the population diagnosed) continues to rise. So while the number of diagnosed cases SEEMS small, the numbers are actually quite large, and growing.

Then I get to say, Um, no you may be sensitive to Gluten, but you are not a true Celiac patient.

I really don't understand why you should treat people as stupid if they say they feel better without eating gluten and then feel superior for diagnosing an untested person with a 'sensitivity' rather than the true celiac disease. (and if they haven't been tested, then you really don't know) If they feel better without gluten, good for them for trying to find a way of eating that makes them feel better. If they eat amaranth and potato flour pasta and still feel like crap, presumably they'll notice that and give up that kind of filler as well. And even if the entire thing is psychosomatic in some people, so what, as long as they're trying to help themselves and find things that feel good in their body? Why judge them for that? Why shame people who are trying to be healthy, just because you don't happen to agree with their struggles to find a diet that makes them feel good inside? What does that gain anyone?

[This message edited by circe at 1:35 PM, November 8th (Friday)]


Posts: 3130 | Registered: Mar 2005
FaithFool
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Member # 20150
Default  Posted: 2:45 PM, November 8th (Friday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

T/J

The problem is that the insects are mutating and becoming resistant to the GMO-pesticide plants, so they have to spray tonnes *more* poisons on those crops to try to keep them going.

That can't be good for humans who eat them.

I understand why the anti-labelling contingent is so powerful, because if people can choose, they will tend to choose the non-GMO products as has been done in the EU.

The whole food system has been messed up beyond belief. And that can't be good for anyone.

Until labelling is brought in, I'll seek out the non-GMO variety. Hopefully freedom of choice will prevail for everyone.

/end TJ

[This message edited by FaithFool at 3:19 PM, November 8th (Friday)]


DDay: June 15, 2008
Mistakenly married Mr. Superfreak
20 years of OWs, WTF?
Divorced Dec 26, 2011
Celebrating 60 years on Earth

Posts: 16613 | Registered: Jul 2008 | From: Canada
Kelany
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Default  Posted: 7:08 AM, November 10th (Sunday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

I don't have celiac's but I do better gluten free, though I fought hard against my doctors about trying it. Both my primary and my gastro wanted me to go GF.

I had the lower 1/3 of my stomach removed due to ulcers and my vagus nerves cut so I no longer produce stomach acid. I can not process food the same anymore. Sugar and I do not get along. Gluten and I don't get along. Lots of things and I no longer get along.

I am glad for more GF options, but no one else in my family is GF or needs to be.


BS - Me
SA/FWH Him
DDay 1 - Jul 11
DDay 2 - Jul 12
R Dec 12

Former 80s Icon wishful thinking


Posts: 1988 | Registered: Feb 2012
Rebreather
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Default  Posted: 10:02 AM, November 10th (Sunday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

Just the title of this is rather offensive to those of us trying to dance the GF dance. It's fucking hard. There is still a lot of conflicting info and the research is ongoing. I find these kind of knee jerk "anti" stories harmful. Now excuse me while I go blend my rice and almond flours with my xanthan gum in order to make marginally palatable muffins for my daughter.


Me BS
Him WH
2 ddays in '07
Recovering.
"The cure for the pain, is the pain." -Rumi

Posts: 5851 | Registered: Jan 2011
NaiveAgain
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Default  Posted: 11:06 AM, November 10th (Sunday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

There is still a lot of conflicting info and the research is ongoing.
Yes, but there are absolutely people that do better going gluten free. Some people's digestive tracts are just not set up to digest wheat, just like some people have difficulty with rice or peanuts.

Same thing with dairy products. We aren't really meant to be eating cow products, so there are a lot of lactose intolerant people walking around. My professor says they are actually the normal ones because Mother Nature never did set us up with the ability to digest cow's milk well. I know I get terrible congestion from dairy products (including my beloved cheese, which I eat anyway and just suffer).


Original WS D-Day July 10, 2008. Kept lying, he is gone.
New WS (2 EA's, no PA) 12-3-13
If you don't like where you are, then change it. You are not a tree.

Posts: 14901 | Registered: Aug 2008 | From: Ohio
kickboxer
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Member # 39858
Default  Posted: 12:48 PM, November 10th (Sunday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

My daughter had symptoms of celiac from the time she was an infant, picking up Cheerios. The doctors blew me off when I brought my concerns to their attention repeatedly in her 1st 2 years of life.

Shortly after her 2nd birthday, she was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes - because 10% of people with T1D also have celiac, she was finally tested. Her labs were positive, and an endoscopic biopsy confirmed the diagnosis.

Celiac is genetic, so we had the entire family tested - my labs were positive, and my diagnosis was also confirmed via endoscopy. I did not have *ANY* symptoms.

Recent studies suggest that gluten exposure prior to 12 months of age could be an environmental factor that triggers the autoimmune destruction of pancreatic beta cells (Type 1 Diabetes). T1D is on the rise globally at a rate of 3-5% per year, and the majority of those people are kids under the age of 5.

My daughter is 10 now, and wears an insulin pump. Without insulin, she will die (Sidenote: November is Diabetes Awareness Month -- WOOT!) What if she had been diagnosed with celiac 1st? What if we had known to eliminate gluten when her symptoms first began? Could we have stopped the autoimmune disaster before it was too late?

We'll never know. Meanwhile, she has to live with both diagnoses for the rest of her life...unless there is a cure.

I appreciate the rise in gluten-free products...but we aren't scamming anyone! This is our reality!!!!!

T/J -- Please know the symptoms of Type 1 Diabetes:

Increased thirst and frequent urination
Extreme hunger
Weight loss
Fatigue
Blurred vision

Type 1 Diabetes can affect any child or adult (usually under the age of 40), regardless of family history, diet, or exercise regimen. If you notice any symptoms of T1D, please call your doctor immediately and demand a urine and/or finger prick screening. DO NOT BE BLOWN OFF! Everyday 40 children and 40 adults are diagnosed with T1D in the U.S. ... and, sadly, everyday someone dies because their diagnosis wasn't caught in time.

[This message edited by kickboxer at 9:00 PM, November 10th (Sunday)]


BW - 41 (Me)
WH - 39 (2 ONS, 6m EA)
Married 13 years, 3 children
DD: 7/13/13
Status: Rugsweeping, I guess.

Posts: 247 | Registered: Jul 2013 | From: Somewhere Out There
Softcentre
Member
Member # 39166
Default  Posted: 2:02 PM, November 10th (Sunday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

I'm not a coeliac but I have issues with gluten (and other foods) because I have both oral allergy syndrome and histamine intolerence. I can tolerate a certain amount but too much or the worng combination of foods and I have a blistered mouth and stomach problems. So I generally stay off wheat and gluten,so that I can eat other more necessary foods, such as dairy and certain meat & vegetables.

I'm grateful for GF foods because it means I can eat pizza - most of the foods I have problems with are in pizza. I don't need pizza, but it's great to have the option


Sorry for my typos & editing, I have a sticky keyboard

Me: BW
Him: STBXWH 'The Arse'
OW1 - EA - my friend
COW - EA/PA - 'Fat Bottomed Girl'

Thanking God for showing me how to smile & dance in the rain


Posts: 480 | Registered: May 2013 | From: UK
HardenMyHeart
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Member # 15902
Default  Posted: 3:12 PM, November 10th (Sunday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

Just the title of this is rather offensive to those of us trying to dance the GF dance.

Now I regret posting this. I was trying to be helpful, especially for those that are dealing with digestive issue.

I thought the article did a good job in questioning why there was is a sudden increase in digestive issues:

But coeliacs make up only one in 100 of the population, while one in five of us is buying gluten-free products. Surveys of US consumers show that, of these, only five per cent are buying to combat coeliac disease, with the vast majority citing their reasons as “digestive health”, “nutritional value” and “to help me lose weight”. People have been eating bread since biblical times without reporting adverse effects. So why has it recently become demonised?

The article then went on to question the manufacturing process:

By juggling a cocktail of enzymes and artificial additives and introducing three times more yeast than had been used before, scientists at the Chorleywood Food Research Institute created a loaf that could be baked instantly without the need for the long "prove" or ferment before going in the oven. The result was a loaf that lasted twice as long and was 40 per cent softer than previous types of bread.

I didn't see this as a knee jerk "anti" article. I appreciated how the article was questioning how our food has been altered to enhance the manufacturing process and the appeal to the consumers. The end result is that the consumer may not understand the full picture of what they are actually buying. People may be turning to GF products, because the processing and ingredients going into the food they are consuming may not be healthy for them.

[This message edited by HardenMyHeart at 4:09 PM, November 10th (Sunday)]


Me: BH, Her: FWW - Long Term EA/PA
d-day: June 25, 2007
Married 29 years, Happily Reconciled

Posts: 5613 | Registered: Aug 2007
Mama_of_3_Kids
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Member # 26651
Default  Posted: 6:51 PM, November 10th (Sunday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

I appreciate the rise in gluten-free products...but we aren't scamming anyone! This is our reality!!!!!

Yep! We have a seven year old who was four months old when we were told she probably had a dairy allergy (projectile vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, etc). About a year ago the symptoms resurfaced and we went to a GI Dr, where she was tested for Celiac. Since last Dec she has been on a GF diet; she has gained 10 POUNDS and all of the other symptoms have resolved. I am thankful for GF, otherwise my daughter would still weigh around 30 lbs at SEVEN YEARS OLD! She's still underweight, but she is so much healthier than she was before.


Me: FBW/30 Him: FWH/33 The kidlets: DS13, DS10, and DD8 The hounds: Four Shih Tzu's
Finally, completely R'd
Clothed in strength and dignity, with nothing to fear, she smiles when she thinks about the future.~Proverbs 31:25

Posts: 11464 | Registered: Dec 2009
circe
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Default  Posted: 8:11 PM, November 10th (Sunday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

I didn't see this as a knee jerk "anti" article.

I did, partially because of the large amount of misinformation in the article, and partly because of editorializing such as this:

Inevitably, in the US, a gluten-free backlash is already under way. “Coeliac: the Trendy Disease for Rich, White People”, is a typical recent headline in the popular blog, Science 2.0.

Unfortunately, the gluten-free community has even less tolerance for jokes than for pasta

I mean seriously. Not only were so many of their facts wrong, but categorically insulting people with a disease or a food sensitivity? Since when is that ok?

. I appreciated how the article was questioning how our food has been altered to enhance the manufacturing process and the appeal to the consumers. The end result is that the consumer may not understand the full picture of what they are actually buying. People may be turning to GF products, because the processing and ingredients going into the food they are consuming may not be healthy for them.

That's true of products with wheat as well. Its not a gluten-free issue, but a processed food issue. I think consumers are capable of reading labels as much as they are of reading a newspaper article, and it's better to base their decisions on the real data (the ingredients) rather than an opinion piece with a lot of misinformation.


Posts: 3130 | Registered: Mar 2005
trumanshow
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Default  Posted: 7:08 AM, November 11th (Monday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

Is that where this fad came from? Dr Oz?


Your ex wanting to be friends is like asking a kidnapper to stay in touch when they let you go.

The type of fierce loyalty that I possess made me incapable of comprehending the level of disloyalty that he possessed


Posts: 1657 | Registered: Sep 2009 | From: Charlotte, NC
tushnurse
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Member # 21101
Default  Posted: 7:57 AM, November 11th (Monday), 2013View ProfileEdit MessagePrivate MessageHomepage

Dr. OZ did his fair share to get the word out that by going gluten free you MAY have less GI distress, and loose wieght more readily.

I feel for all the folks that have a sensitivity, and have to make the choice to gluten free, and Do NOT want it to seem that I don't. However for us that work/worked in the medical community, particularly GI world, you would be amazed by the number of people that come to us, and simply state that they have Celiac. Or have a True Allergy to Gluten. The comment about it being a "rich white peoples disease" is somewhat offensive, it is however a "first world problem". These folks come in and have had no significant issues with weight loss, anemia, and all the other stuff that goes with Celiac, but want that diagnosis, and are very disappointed when we do the real deal tests for Celiac and they are negative.

I know that there a lot of folks out there that have a sensativity, and their IBS is greatly improved by skipping the gluten, or minimizing it, but I also KNOW that there are just as many people out there with IBS/Sesnsitive Gut issues that Do NOT have it.

I have always likened IBS to Fibromyalgia, as it both are diagnosed by exclusion of other things. We test for a bazillion other things, and when we cant find anything wrong, clinically, then the diagnosis is made. IBS is a PIA to deal with for sure.
There are ways to manage it, and figure out what your triggers are, and for some people it as simple as eliminating a specific food type, Dairy, Lycenes, etc. But for others it's much more complicated, and sometimes is never effectively managed. IF you are someone with IBS you should always try a few things to see if you can eliminate the stimulus of IBS- One being a dairy fast, and so forth and so on until you can pinpoint trigger foods. Also adding a probiotic is an essential step that many people overlook, I have seen it make a huge difference.

HOWEVER - Gluten Free - for issues like weight loss, or just to be healthier, may make the average person very unhappy. The ONLY thing that works for real weight loss is eating less and moving more.

So that was my point in the original response to this post. I apologize if I have offended anyone. I am happy that there are a lot more palatable options these days as when it was an issue, 20 years ago those folks can tell you it was a very limited diet, and most of those patients lived on an very Atkinsesque diet.


Me: FBS
Him: FWS
Kids: 14 & 16
Married for 21 years now, was 16 at the time. .
D-Day Sept 26 2008
Fully R'd, and Happy Happy Happy

Posts: 6549 | Registered: Oct 2008 | From: St. Louis
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