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User Topic: Personal Finance
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Member # 10
Default  Posted: 11:51 AM, October 19th (Friday)

Tips and/or learning to help build up and improve finanical responsibilities.

Posts: 10000 | Registered: May 2002
Puppyb
Member
Member # 15226
Default  Posted: 11:55 AM, October 19th (Friday)

Thanks Mods....

Just share with you one link I saved on my laptop, hopefully it helps.

https://www.vancity.ca/MyMoney/Tools/Calculators/

[This message edited by Puppyb at 12:15 PM, October 19th (Friday)]


My current love:-
http://blufiles.storage.live.com/y1perkrFH89ZT1rQyAs5Flq04xyZr004AJTaJkH9NmW_JBi-sm0FpPlTXr8atJSXWLK

Posts: 1556 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: Toronto, Canada
findingme32
Member
Member # 12833
Default  Posted: 1:01 PM, October 19th (Friday)

Cool site, thanks puppyb. My WH really wasted a lot of money due to his need to validate himself and it is ranked top along side his A.


One sided love is NEVER enough!

Posts: 1159 | Registered: Dec 2006 | From: I'm not sure anymore...
Threnody
Member
Member # 1558
Default  Posted: 1:59 PM, October 19th (Friday)

For people who are currently pinching pennies or trying to reduce your overall spending, I have found this is the BEST way to save on groceries:

www.grocerygame.com

I have whittled a $200/week shopping trip down to an average of $120. It's couponing, but more than that it's trend-tracking on merchandise sales so you get the BEST money saved while using a coupon. It helps you stockpile items as well, like toilet paper, cleaning supplies or non perishable/long-life foods. I went for six months without having to buy cereal, toilet paper, ketchup and mustard, laundry or dish soaps, sodas and diapers. Yes, diapers. That stuff is EXPENSIVE when you add it all up.

If you have a buddy to trade coupons with, it's even better. You trade what coupons you don't use for ones you do, then go buy and add to your stockpile.

Keep a spreadsheet on what the grocerygame.com membership fee is, associated newspaper cost is, and what your grocery receipt discount is. It will take about four weeks for you to see the REALLY big savings hit, but you'll stand up and cheer when you see the final math at that point.


“If you don't like my opinion of you, you can always improve.” ~ Ashleigh Brilliant
"Great love requires determination." ~ tryingtwo
"Don't try to win over the haters, you're not the jackass whisperer." ~ Brene Brown

Posts: 14039 | Registered: Jun 2003 | From: Middle-of-Diddly, TX
Puppyb
Member
Member # 15226
Default  Posted: 2:08 PM, October 19th (Friday)

For Canada coupons

www.save.ca


My current love:-
http://blufiles.storage.live.com/y1perkrFH89ZT1rQyAs5Flq04xyZr004AJTaJkH9NmW_JBi-sm0FpPlTXr8atJSXWLK

Posts: 1556 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: Toronto, Canada
dreamlife
Member
Member # 8142
Default  Posted: 3:21 PM, October 19th (Friday)

A lot of the stores here don't accept coupons...& I have to face the fact that they tend to drive me Crazy.

I usually buy items on sale 3 @ a time & it goes into my pantry with shelves or my freezer.

These are long life items/dry goods/canned or meat/turkey, etc., I do incorporate into meals often.

I do the usual cook for an army & freeze portions so all I have to do is defrost/reheat.

I bought 2 turkey wings for $1.26 and they bubbled away on my stove for 2 nights in a row
& this helped to heat my home as well. (It sure beats turning on propane-fueled whole house furnace!) I made a delicious turkey soup by adding a can of French onion soup, 1-2 C. of frozen mixed veggies, spices, a pinch of red pepper flakes, & egg noodles.

Or, I'll cook chicken & ribs in my stew pot, freeze them for spring/summer BBQ's, & use the skimmed off stock for soups or Spanish Meatball stew.


~XWH told me what I wanted to hear but he always did whatever he wanted to do~

Posts: 25351 | Registered: Sep 2005
misto1976
Member
Member # 14803
Default  Posted: 3:43 PM, October 19th (Friday)

My boss swears by the grocerygame site! It seems like a really good deal.


Me - FBS/FWS (EA) 31
Him - FBS/FWH 30
Three kids
DDay - Feb. 21, 2007
R - Feb. 23, 2007 Still working every day
OW - is a not going to invade my thoughts anymore :)

Posts: 218 | Registered: May 2007 | From: Texas
I_used_to_smile
Member
Member # 14113
Default  Posted: 6:13 PM, October 19th (Friday)

I had to learn to STOP using all credit cards. I owe more in credit card debt, just me myself alone, than I make in a year. While TBXH was still here, it didn't seem like such a big deal. Now it's terrifying.

If this is you. Stop. Think about every purchase. Run your balance owed through a mortgage calculator to see how long it will take to pay off each card. Once your breath comes back, and your heart starts beating again, print those off and post them. Put a copy where you usually sit to pay your bills. Make a determined and disciplined effort to throw extra onto the high rate cards. Every little bit helps. Pay off the high rate cards first.

Call your creditor to ask them to reduce your APR. Sometimes they will, and sometimes they'll be hardasses. (Bank of America, I'm looking at you!) Again, every little bit helps. If they'll reduce it for 3 months, try to pay as much as you can during those 3 months.

Do you really NEED 5,084 channels on tv? No - they're all shopping channels anyway, which you shouldn't be doing. Drop to the lowest level of programmimg available. Yeah, you'll miss it at first, but not forever.

Shop at generic/big lots/no frills stores. Investigate whether it makes sense for you to get a membership to Sam's Club or something similar and buy in bulk.

Cook extra when you make dinner and pack lunch-sized portions to freeze to take to work. Drink water and take coffee in a thermos. Starbucks and Dunkin' Donuts have great coffee, but at $3-4 per cup? It adds up.

If you're running out of money before the next paycheck or support payment (and I'm sure 99% of us have been there/done that), consider paying for a financial counselor to look at your situation. It's what they do - find ways to make money go farther. There are also state and local programs which offer free financial counseling.

Dollar stores are great for certain types of things. If you've never been, investigate to see what they offer. I will never pay regular store prices for gift wrap/bags ever again.

None of these are original suggestions, all help to economize.


"Activity and sadness are incompatible."

- Christian Bovee

"It serves me right for putting all my eggs in one bastard."

- Dorothy Parker


Posts: 1373 | Registered: Mar 2007 | From: East coast
Puppyb
Member
Member # 15226
Default  Posted: 6:19 PM, October 19th (Friday)

Great tips I_used_to_smile

Thanks for sharing


My current love:-
http://blufiles.storage.live.com/y1perkrFH89ZT1rQyAs5Flq04xyZr004AJTaJkH9NmW_JBi-sm0FpPlTXr8atJSXWLK

Posts: 1556 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: Toronto, Canada
dreamlife
Member
Member # 8142
Default  Posted: 8:52 AM, October 21st (Sunday)

Yes, great tips!

My freezer is My Best Friend.

My daughter calls me:
"The Freezer Queen"!


~XWH told me what I wanted to hear but he always did whatever he wanted to do~

Posts: 25351 | Registered: Sep 2005
notmyfairytale
Member
Member # 15348
Default  Posted: 11:38 AM, October 21st (Sunday)

I work for a bank in the mortgage department, I am availiable for questions, concerns or as a sounding board on credit questions. While I am not a certified credit counselor, I did work for Equifax in the customer service department. Will be happy to help anyone who needs it, I am only a PM away.


me- 30 FBS
him 38 FWS
MadHatter in my First M

Reconciled.

Proud member of the purple Dyson club.

Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, pee on it and walk away.

Have you hugged your MOD today?


Posts: 1729 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: SC
closertofine
Member
Member # 14662
Default  Posted: 10:18 PM, October 21st (Sunday)

Yippeee! I'm so glad this was started!

I'm always looking at ways to save money. Especially now.

I'd like to share a site that I recently found. Lots of great articles.

http://zenhabits.net/2007/07/the-12-step-get-out-of-debt-program/

[This message edited by closertofine at 10:19 PM, October 21st (Sunday)]


"Scrape. Feel. Dig. Believe. Ask"- Douglas Coupland, Girlfriend in a Coma

Posts: 1486 | Registered: May 2007 | From: Manitoba
wasfooled2
Member
Member # 13783
Default  Posted: 2:13 PM, October 22nd (Monday)

We did the grocery game for a while, but stopped. Found that we saved so much money each money that we didn't need to pay the grocery game lady anymore.

Question --- When you are super duper in debt, what should the bill priorities be each month, if you know you can't pay them all?


(Me) BS-39
(Him) WS-41 (serial cheater)
D-Day #7 2/24/07 (lost count)
Married 15 years; together for 23
Reconciled, or so I thought. Separated & divorcing.

Better off I sparkle on my own ~ Anna Nalick


Posts: 5583 | Registered: Feb 2007 | From: Chicago Suburbs
notmyfairytale
Member
Member # 15348
Default  Posted: 11:03 AM, October 23rd (Tuesday)

Mortgage/Rent and Utilities first. YOu have to have water and a place to live... you do not need cable or the cell phone. Then prioritize after that. The list I give to my clients is always this:

Rent/Mortgage
Lights
Water
Heat
Car and Insurance
Phone
Then prioritize due to your individual needs. If you are on medications, I always put that in the top 3 as well.


me- 30 FBS
him 38 FWS
MadHatter in my First M

Reconciled.

Proud member of the purple Dyson club.

Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, pee on it and walk away.

Have you hugged your MOD today?


Posts: 1729 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: SC
Beacon
Member
Member # 16455
Default  Posted: 1:59 PM, October 24th (Wednesday)

I'm going to jump in. On a different note, (I posted this in another forum too) if you don't have separate accounts from your spouse then I highly recommend that you get separate accounts. As long as you can agree on who pays for what, and the bills get paid, then whatever is left over is yours and you don't have to answer to anybody about how it is spent. In my previous marriage, the XW paid all the bills and I had to ask for money. This marriage, we both have separate accounts, my wife pays for her bills and I pay for mine. Luckily, my wife and I don't argue about money.


Divorced 4 years ago

Posts: 175 | Registered: Oct 2007 | From: Texas
beach
Member
Member # 7533
Default  Posted: 2:28 PM, October 24th (Wednesday)

Thank you for starting this!


ETA: Has anyone read "Extreme money make over"? I have tried some of the things that author suggested.

Use debit card.
I don't carry cash anymore..

[This message edited by beach at 2:38 PM, October 24th (Wednesday)]


If you don't find peace with yourself, you cannot find anywhere else.
Appreciate and cherish what I have.

Posts: 8680 | Registered: Jul 2005 | From: midwest
wasfooled2
Member
Member # 13783
Default  Posted: 4:16 PM, October 24th (Wednesday)

Thanks, NMF.

I definitely have to put medications up there...I spend about $350 a month on copays!!

Does anyone know if credit card companies will ever cut you a break if you are having financial problems? Deferred payments or something?


(Me) BS-39
(Him) WS-41 (serial cheater)
D-Day #7 2/24/07 (lost count)
Married 15 years; together for 23
Reconciled, or so I thought. Separated & divorcing.

Better off I sparkle on my own ~ Anna Nalick


Posts: 5583 | Registered: Feb 2007 | From: Chicago Suburbs
unabletocope
Member
Member # 11730
Default  Posted: 4:41 PM, October 24th (Wednesday)

Was- yes, they will (sometimes). Call and talk to them. Tell them what's going on and ask for a lower APR. Ask for a deferment. Many of them will help you out rather than risk never getting anything.

Same goes for many mortgage companies.


me-LTA BW


Posts: 2598 | Registered: Aug 2006
notmyfairytale
Member
Member # 15348
Default  Posted: 5:00 PM, October 24th (Wednesday)

Yes! Call the mortgage company before you miss a payment, and credit card companies will also work with you but usually AFTER you become late. PM me for more info on how to deal with the credit card peoples. You sometimes have to get nasty before they will agree to reduce the APR.


me- 30 FBS
him 38 FWS
MadHatter in my First M

Reconciled.

Proud member of the purple Dyson club.

Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, pee on it and walk away.

Have you hugged your MOD today?


Posts: 1729 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: SC
wasfooled2
Member
Member # 13783
Default  Posted: 12:32 PM, October 26th (Friday)

Tried some of the CC companies. They said no. Calling mortgage co. today. I hate this. I never would have guessed my finances would be going down the toilet so suddenly and so fast!!


(Me) BS-39
(Him) WS-41 (serial cheater)
D-Day #7 2/24/07 (lost count)
Married 15 years; together for 23
Reconciled, or so I thought. Separated & divorcing.

Better off I sparkle on my own ~ Anna Nalick


Posts: 5583 | Registered: Feb 2007 | From: Chicago Suburbs
beach
Member
Member # 7533
Default  Posted: 7:40 PM, October 26th (Friday)

(((wasfooled))),

To answer your original question, you want to pay off the credit card that has the higest interest first. We consolidated 2-3 C.C. by getting the home equity loan (signature loan) and you can itemize the interest on the schedule A.

Can you or your H get the 401K loan? Depends on the retirement plan, you can borrow up to half of your 401K balance (I mean borrowing from your 401K account). I did that when we had to put the down payment on our new house 3 years ago. It was 4.5% then. Now it is 7.5%.

Good luck.

[This message edited by beach at 6:18 PM, October 27th (Saturday)]


If you don't find peace with yourself, you cannot find anywhere else.
Appreciate and cherish what I have.

Posts: 8680 | Registered: Jul 2005 | From: midwest
beach
Member
Member # 7533
Default  Posted: 5:12 PM, October 27th (Saturday)

Wasfooled, you also know that "Medical expense" is deductible on the schedule A, right?


If you don't find peace with yourself, you cannot find anywhere else.
Appreciate and cherish what I have.

Posts: 8680 | Registered: Jul 2005 | From: midwest
Puppyb
Member
Member # 15226
Exclaimation  Posted: 6:04 PM, October 27th (Saturday)

Article on ways to help curb your spending
-----------------------------

NEW YORK (MarketWatch) -- Is impulse buying taking a heavy toll on your budget? Here are six ways to get a handle on your spending:

1.Identify your triggers. Many people use shopping as an emotional outlet. But letting your emotions dictate your spending is nearly always a bad idea. To break yourself of the habit, try to determine what prompts you to spend unwisely and take steps to change your behavior.

2.Avoid temptation. If you're inclined to overspend, consider a self-imposed ban on window shopping, casual browsing and unnecessary trips to the mall. Hint: If you know you're going to be in a situation where you're likely to be tempted, leave your credit card at home and only bring as much cash as you absolutely need.

3. Be a cautious consumer. You may think you're immune to advertising, but even the savviest shoppers fall prey to marketing tactics now and again. Next time you find yourself eyeing a "new and improved" product, ask yourself why you feel compelled to buy it. Will that new golf club/razor/skin cream substantially improve your life or just deplete your bank account?

4. Take a time-out. If you stumble on a "must have" item, don't get caught up in the excitement, advises MSN Money columnist Liz Pulliam Weston. Take a deep breath and walk away. Give yourself anywhere from a few days to a few weeks to figure out if this is something that you can afford and really need. After the cool-down period, if you can truthfully answer yes to both questions, go ahead and splurge.

5. Remember long-term goals. Before you buy, ask yourself if you'll get more long-term satisfaction out of owning this item, paying down your debt or putting money toward that dream vacation. You may get a temporary boost from buying that scarf, but that doesn't mean it's the best use of your money.

6. Check you balance. If you find yourself standing in the checkout line, ready to buy something you're not sure you can afford, hold off, suggests Weston. Go to your local bank or log on to your bank account online. Once you've viewed your balance, the purchase may appear far less enticing.

http://www.marketwatch.com/news/story/six-ways-curb-impulse-spending/story.aspx?guid=%7B799C6C7C%2D2B74%2D4C22%2D97E2%2DDC723C5B0FF8%7D

[This message edited by Puppyb at 6:06 PM, October 27th (Saturday)]


My current love:-
http://blufiles.storage.live.com/y1perkrFH89ZT1rQyAs5Flq04xyZr004AJTaJkH9NmW_JBi-sm0FpPlTXr8atJSXWLK

Posts: 1556 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: Toronto, Canada
beach
Member
Member # 7533
Default  Posted: 6:07 PM, October 27th (Saturday)

Thanks puppyb!! That is so true.


If you don't find peace with yourself, you cannot find anywhere else.
Appreciate and cherish what I have.

Posts: 8680 | Registered: Jul 2005 | From: midwest
DownNotOut
Member
Member # 10076
Default  Posted: 8:33 AM, November 5th (Monday)

Ooohhh...I need this thread!

Our financial woes stem from the move. We took a huge pay hit moving here. FWH lost a lot of his incentive pay and I didn't find work until August.

We're in collections pugatory!

However, slowly but surely we're getting things paid off. It's still a struggle, and there's still not enough money, but we're making progress.

Here's a few things I'm working on:

Make a larger than minimum payment on the highest interest rate cc. Once that one is paid off, apply that same amount of money, plus the minimum we normally pay, on the NEXT highest APR card. And so on down the line.

Open up a savings that you do not withdraw from. Then do a direct debit to it each month. Hey, it may only be $50 a month, but it does add up. I'm prone to splurging and I consider this to be a "splurge." I imagine having anice fat security cushion and it makes me feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

Stop eating out except for special occasions. In this state, there is a 10% tax on dining. It's horrid! Eat at home! Make your lunches to take to work. Make your own lattes and put them in a thermos instead of dropping $4 on Starbucks. Cook in bulk and freeze the remainder. Not only will it keep you from having to cook for several nights, it's an effective use of your time and resources.

One that I will be doing once the lease is up. Move to a smaller, cheaper place. I know this won't work for lots of people but we rent and have no kids so it's not hard. We'll do the move with friends, the rental truck costs will be minimal compared to the fact that we'll go from paying $1000 for a house we don't need to a cozy $600 apartment. Utilities will be cheaper too!

Downgrade to bone basic cable.

Sell unwanted or not needed items. I will be a Craigslist fool in the upcoming months. I have a lot of things to sell.

Of course none of these tips are new. But it helped me to type them and see them written here. Maybe they'll help someone else too.

[This message edited by DownNotOut at 8:35 AM, November 5th (Monday)]


"Never allow someone to be your priority while allowing yourself to be their option."
~ nimbyone

"Beauty is between one's ears anyway, isn't it?"
~ bkewidow


Posts: 1606 | Registered: Mar 2006 | From: Unemployed and Hating It
kryvan
Member
Member # 10174
Default  Posted: 11:45 AM, November 7th (Wednesday)

YEAH!!! I'm in so much debt that we live with my WH family. Yes, there is three families living under the same roof. Not sure why the other family is here since they can afford to have a house..but who knows.

We became in debt because my H wanted to buy things for himself and his girlfriend and now I have to pay for it.

I'm trying to save money so I can get the heck out of this place. This will be good I think.


Me: FBS 2005/ WS 2013
H: WS 2005 / poss WS 2013-14
Daughters: 13 & 5

Found out: Oct 2 2005

They say marriages are made in heaven.But so is thunder and lightning.


Posts: 279 | Registered: Mar 2006
beach
Member
Member # 7533
Default  Posted: 2:55 PM, November 7th (Wednesday)

kryvan,
BTDT. I feel for you. It's been 16 years since we lived with H's parents for 2 years (FIL, MIL, BIL and his live in GF, 4 of us... )to save money so we can put the down payment for our own house. I didn't like it, but it helped.


If you don't find peace with yourself, you cannot find anywhere else.
Appreciate and cherish what I have.

Posts: 8680 | Registered: Jul 2005 | From: midwest
Puppyb
Member
Member # 15226
Happy  Posted: 9:57 PM, November 9th (Friday)

http://money.cnn.com/2007/11/06/pf/retirement/revell.moneymag/index.htm?postversion=2007110617

Wanna retire rich? Don't spend like Britney

Whether you're worth $100 million like Ms. Spears or $100, the same simple strategies can help ensure a comfortable retirement.

By Janice Revell, Money Magazine senior writer
November 6 2007: 5:15 PM EST
NEW YORK (Money) -- In case you missed it, some bombshell news came out of the personal finance arena last week. No, I'm not referring to the Federal Reserve's rate cut or the record-breaking price of oil.
I'm talking about Britney Spears: She isn't saving for retirement.
Money Magazine senior writer Janice Revell
Britney Spears takes in some $737,000 a month - yet still manages to spend it all.

Though the 25-year old pop star is hauling in some $737,000 a month (yes, per month), the Associated Press reported last Thursday that according to court documents, she's not saving or investing a penny of it.
More than $100,000 each month is going to entertainment, gifts and vacations alone.
While most of us may be shocked by this excess, Ms. Spears' saving habits are actually pretty normal.
The truth is, the overwhelming majority of American 20-somethings aren't saving anything for retirement, either. Research from Vanguard shows that two-thirds of all 25-year-olds who have access to a 401(k) plan aren't contributing.
And the worst part is, they aren't taking advantage of their biggest asset: time.
Let's go back to Ms. Spears' retirement plan for a minute. Now I know that she's richer than you and I, worth in the neighborhood of $100 million from her previous sales and touring (she didn't always spend it all). But let's say she was forced to start from scratch, like any other 25-year-old. She could still maintain her lavish lifestyle in retirement.
Assuming she could scrape by on 70% to 80% of her pre-retirement income in retirement - or about $590,000 a month in today's dollars - Ms. Spears would have to accumulate a nest egg of just over $300 million by age 65.
Sound daunting? Nah. All she has to do is keep working and put away 8% or so of her monthly $737,000 income until she retires and she'll hit that goal.
So what's the point of this exercise? Well, the very same strategy can work for you too.
Being sure to set aside just a little each month can help you maintain your lifestyle in perpetuity.
A 25-yr old making $30,000 a year, for instance, and putting away the same 8% of his pay into a 401(k) plan annually for the rest of his career is virtually guaranteed a comfortable retirement by time he hits his 60s.
Assuming average historic rates of inflation and investment returns, and a typical company matching contribution in his 401(k), he would wind up with a nest egg of nearly $2 million by age 65, enough to replace more than 90% of his working income.
I realize that, unlike Ms. Spears, you may also have student loans to pay back at this point in your life. But unless it's a private loan, don't sacrifice your 401(k) contribution to make extra payments on the loan. If it's a federal loan, and you've consolidated it, you likely have a fixed after-tax rate of 5% or less. Over the longer haul, you will handily beat that return in your 401(k); if you get a company matching contribution, you'll trounce it.
And you don't need to hire a team of people to handle your investments. Just put your 8% in a so-called target-date retirement fund - every major fund company offers them, including Fidelity, Vanguard, and T. Rowe Price.
Here, you make your fund choice based on the expected year of your retirement. For instance, if you were planning to retire in 40 years' time, you might pick the T. Rowe Price Retirement 2050 fund. Right now, it has an 88% allocation to stocks, 10% to bonds and the rest in cash.
As time passes, and you get closer to retirement, the fund will automatically adjust that mix of stocks and bonds to more conservative levels. The best part with these funds is that you do nothing.
And that means you'll never have to say, 'Oops! I did it again' when it comes to your retirement.


My current love:-
http://blufiles.storage.live.com/y1perkrFH89ZT1rQyAs5Flq04xyZr004AJTaJkH9NmW_JBi-sm0FpPlTXr8atJSXWLK

Posts: 1556 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: Toronto, Canada
burnt_toast
Member
Member # 16891
Default  Posted: 1:04 PM, December 9th (Sunday)

My tips, learned pre-wedding :

Slippers and a good sweather save a lot of heating costs in winter. Add a warm blaket and tea when watching TV or reading books...nice.

The dishwasher doesn't need to run the full course of the drying cycle...

Stock, stock, stock when it's on special, like there is gonna be a nuclear war.

For the ones living alone : You can't loose half of your frozen vegetables... they're frozen ! A dab of butter will help the taste.

Rice is the 8th wonder of the world for the financially tight.

Beans of all kind supply protein, and are a cheap alternative for meat, once in a while. Same goes for tofu!

Invest in good herbs, spices and oils. Variety will be yours at all times (even if stucked eating tofu, rice, and beans for a whole month!) and anything will be tasty.

Gotta love spaghetti, stew, chili, burritos, carrot salad, and pea soup !

A pair of free weights and a blanket is all you need at home to build great arms and abs.

Retaurants are an option, not a necessity, more often than you think. So is wine at the reataurant... often as expensive as the food itself.

Skating, sliding, hiking and window shopping are fun and don't cost a buck.

Check out the activities at the community center of library. Some present, films, plays, exibits and confrences for free of cheap. In some big cities, the central library IS actually a fun place to hang out. You can spend the day in a sofa reading magazines there for free!

Potlucks are a great and super fun alternative to receiving friends on your own or going to restaurants. The meals every guest brings fuel the conversation and results in receipe exchanges! Bonus!

A sewing machine is a great investment. Skinny jeans are in... make your own in a stitch from these old boot-cut ! This other shirt could be repaired instead of being thrashed... etc.

There are still tuns of black pants and skirts in stores after christmas, often 50% off and more... these basics will still be in next season...

If you can't afford a varied and lenghty wardrobe, overuse black and get a variety of colorful accessries instead! No one will notice you worned that blouse twice this week, they'll be too busy looking at your funky necklace.

Do it yourself, do it yourself, do it yourself.

Some micro-brewery beers are pretty fancy and go nicely with a good meal...instead of wine...

Used furniture can be as cheap and as stylish as IKEA's, but sturdier! All you may need is time, pain remover and sandpaper...

If you must, avoid reading fashion magazines ! They excell at giving you this urge, that you MUST buy this new thing or get a piece of THIS color for the season...who needs "360 essentials" in their wardrobe just this season?

Hope this helps!


It is what it is.

Posts: 4681 | Registered: Nov 2007 | From: Quelque part
Puppyb
Member
Member # 15226
Default  Posted: 3:25 PM, December 12th (Wednesday)

Great Thread - Financial Infidelity: Is your mate cheating on you ?

http://moneycentral.msn.com/community/message/thread.asp?threadid=105762&boardname=Hide&header=SearchOnly&footer=Show&boardsparam=Page%3D1&linktarget=_parent&pagestyle=money1&forumid=18&board=YourMoney

[This message edited by Puppyb at 3:26 PM, December 12th (Wednesday)]


My current love:-
http://blufiles.storage.live.com/y1perkrFH89ZT1rQyAs5Flq04xyZr004AJTaJkH9NmW_JBi-sm0FpPlTXr8atJSXWLK

Posts: 1556 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: Toronto, Canada
Puppyb
Member
Member # 15226
Default  Posted: 3:31 PM, December 12th (Wednesday)

One of the reply (message #74):-

A point many of you are missing is a person's psychological relationship to money. This is an important nuance to determine when entering into a relationship. There is a huge difference between simply having bad money management skills vs using money to medicate emotional pain. A person can learn money good management skills, if they want to. If your significant other has poor money management skills and wants to learn to do better, there is hope for a satisfying long-term relationship. However, it's a completely different story if the person has money problems due to emotional issues. Many people buy "stuff" to fill a big, black emotional hole. You can't solve this type of money problem with money. That is why many of you find yourselves bailing your SO out over and over again and always ending back up in the same place. This problem is best left to to your SO and his or her therapist. Having a satisfying relationship with someone who is psychologically abusing money is infinitely more problematic and the chances of long-term success are much less. Many of your stories have proven this.


My current love:-
http://blufiles.storage.live.com/y1perkrFH89ZT1rQyAs5Flq04xyZr004AJTaJkH9NmW_JBi-sm0FpPlTXr8atJSXWLK

Posts: 1556 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: Toronto, Canada
Mommato4
Member
Member # 15906
Default  Posted: 11:26 PM, December 16th (Sunday)

Here is a website for those who are contemplating or have filed for BK. Some is pretty common sense, but there is good info for whatever situation.

http://www.lifeafterbankruptcy.com

Hope it can help if you need it.


Updated 2013:
BS-me 40
XH-doesn't matter
4 kids D16, D15, S12, S7
Together 15+yrs, Married 12+yrs
D-days-multiple
Separated 11/9/07
Divorcing-I filed 4/29/08
Divorced-7/25/08

Posts: 1347 | Registered: Aug 2007 | From: PNW country
notmyfairytale
Member
Member # 15348
Default  Posted: 11:06 AM, December 22nd (Saturday)

A couple of people have responded to my post earlier on this thread and asked about credit counseling - I am just going to throw this out here:

IF you choose to go this route, please make sure the service you use is part of the National Association of Credit Counselors. This association monitors its members and makes sure they are operating in your best interest. Some of the ones you see advertised on TV are just out to take your money and make your problem worse.


me- 30 FBS
him 38 FWS
MadHatter in my First M

Reconciled.

Proud member of the purple Dyson club.

Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, pee on it and walk away.

Have you hugged your MOD today?


Posts: 1729 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: SC
gibbonsrose
Member
Member # 16280
Default  Posted: 11:21 AM, December 29th (Saturday)

Cheap, easy meals from http://www.frugallawstudent.com/2007/09/05/12-meals-that-are-easy-cheap-and-healthy/

1. White Beans and Tomatoes - You need: Crock-pot, Olive oil, onion, garlic, 3 6” stalks of fresh rosemary, large can of diced tomatoes, and 2 cans of white/northern beans. Sauté chopped onions in olive oil in the crock-pot on the high setting for about 15 minutes. Add chopped garlic and sauté for 5 more minutes. Then add the rest of the ingredients and let it cook on low in the crock-pot for however long you want. Nothing in this recipe needs cooking so its just a matter of the longer it cooks together the more flavor it will have. I live in Northern California and rosemary is a ubiquitous landscaping plant here so I have an endless free supply. I think it is prolific in other parts of the country too. You might add a little cumin or Tabasco sauce too. Serve with brown bread and a little parmesan cheese.

2. Black Bean Salad – You need: 1 can black beans, 1 can corn or frozen corn, 1 lime, ~2T fresh chopped cilantro, a fresh veggie (I like green pepper or tomato or avocado if you want to splurge). Add all ingredients to a tuper-wear and juice the lime. You might also add some chili powder or tobasco. Let it marinate together for at least 30 minutes. Eat with corn chips.

3. Pasta – You need: whole wheat pasta, jar of marinara sauce (I like Classico’s selections), chopped frozen broccoli, parmesan cheese. I like to mix all these ingredients together but you could eat broccoli as a side dish.

4. Ramen Stir Fry – You need: 2 pack ramen noodles, green pepper, onion, 3 eggs, 2T roasted peanuts, stir-fry seasoning. Soak the ramen noodles in warm water while you prep other ingredients. Sauté onion and green pepper. Add 3 eggs and scramble in the same pan as onion and green pepper but keeping the egg somewhat separate. Add the noodles and seasoning. I like to season with a sauce made from soy sauce, ginger, a little sesame oil, a little brown sugar, and quite a bit of lime juice.

5. Burritos – You need: Green pepper, onion, can of black beans, tortilla’s, cheese and salsa. Sauté green pepper and onion. Add black beans and season with chili powder, garlic powder, cumin, and lime juice. Serve on flour tortilla’s with cheese (I think grating is worth it) and salsa.

6. Fried Rice – You need: Rice, frozen peas, 2 eggs, onion, garlic, soy sauce, and ginger. I like to make rice ahead of time on the weekend and eat it several times. I usually cook rice in chicken bouillon for flavor. So sauté onion and add frozen peas to defrost. Scramble eggs in same pan. Add rice, ginger, and garlic. Add soy sauce and some sesame oil to taste.

7. Curry Mushroom “Chicken” - You need: Cooked chicken breast or fake chicken (I like Quorn), frozen chopped broccoli, cream of mushroom soup, lemon juice, curry powder, shredded cheddar cheese. Defrost frozen items in microwave. Add a scoop of mushroom soup, ½ T of curry powder, some lemon juice and shredded cheddar to the bowl and microwave again. You could eat with brown rice.

8. Baked potato – Baked potatoes are great because you can put so many things on top of them. Some of the thing I like to put on are Morningstar crumbles (fake hamburger meat), sautéed mushrooms (season with Worcestershire), broccoli, salsa, shredded cheese, or black beans.

9. Salmon Cakes – You need: 1 can pink salmon, 1 can white/northern beans, lemon juice, dill or thyme, minced garlic, 1 egg. Mix all ingredients together mashing beans and salmon. Make into patties and fry in olive oil. Serve on brown bread and add a dollop of plain yogurt or sour cream if you like.

10. Veggie Burgers – Buy a pack of frozen veggie burgers (Morning star veggie burgers will usually go on sale for about $.75/patty.) serve on wheat toast (b/c I don’t like to buy special buns) with thinly sliced cheese and mustard.

11. Hot dogs – Depending on whether cheap or healthy is more important to me at the time, I will buy veggie hot dogs (healthy) or turkey hot dogs (cheap). We like eating them on whole wheat sandwich bread with sauerkraut and mustard. We usually have a can of baked beans on the side.

12. Heuvos Rancheros – You need: 4 eggs, flour tortillas, black beans, salsa, and shredded cheese. Scramble eggs. Warm tortillas in the microwave. Warm black beans sprinkled with lime juice, chili powder, and garlic powder in the microwave. Top tortillas with beans, egg, shredded cheese, and salsa.



Me - Befuckled
WH - Limber at limbo *sigh*

Posts: 5040 | Registered: Sep 2007 | From: mountain transplant
Bluest Mood
Member
Member # 17171
Default  Posted: 12:39 AM, December 31st (Monday)

The only thing I know about credit it to avoid it. My H just got something in the mail, they said it was a special delivery that only he could sign for. He wasn't home, so I researched this company and found it is just a scammy way to serve you with a subpoena. Apparently one of his credit card companies has decided to file a lawsuit against him.


How is it that even when I go to an entirely different theme park, I still end up on the SAME damned merry-go-round?!

Posts: 193 | Registered: Nov 2007
dreamlife
Member
Member # 8142
Default  Posted: 12:03 PM, January 25th (Friday)

Has anyone ever invested $100 in ShareBuilders.com?

I was reading msn Money recently about it.

For DD special birthday next month, I did buy her a gift (unframed) at One Share.com...was just wondering if any one else has used these 2 sites at all?


~XWH told me what I wanted to hear but he always did whatever he wanted to do~

Posts: 25351 | Registered: Sep 2005
jjct
Member
Member # 17484
Default  Posted: 8:13 PM, January 26th (Saturday)

Bookmarked.

Dream, could you give a basic idea - or maybe someone could? - of the difference between sharebuilder & other like -sites?

Being honest here...I have directed my attention, and become proficient in my profession. I love it - no prob. Thing is, it's a "people profession" -
I have come to the realization that I am clueless about money & investing.
Any help would be muchly appreciated regarding stocks, investing, saving, etc.


Posts: 6012 | Registered: Dec 2007 | From: texas
dreamlife
Member
Member # 8142
Default  Posted: 9:18 PM, January 26th (Saturday)

jj~ I'm afraid I'm not adept at this, either, & so was hoping from other more learned input here...of course, I could ask my WH -- who is an MBA-- but he would only tell me the same old "script":
'I don't know a thing about any of that, sweetie...'
(Its the *Power & Control* & SELFISHNESS of an NPD).
All I know was that after reading the msn Money article, it seemed like a good place to begin. And the one share I had purchased for DD went UP shortly after.


~XWH told me what I wanted to hear but he always did whatever he wanted to do~

Posts: 25351 | Registered: Sep 2005
iminsideout
Member
Member # 16355
Default  Posted: 6:04 PM, April 10th (Thursday)

Does anyone know anything about asking credit card companies to verify the debt you owe. I once spoke with a man who said that if they can't prove the debt is yours, you are forgiven that debt. I know this true with collection agencies, but not sure about cc companies.

I'm not sure how I really feel about that, because you should pay the debts you owe, but I was just curious.


Posts: 1093 | Registered: Sep 2007 | From: FL
feelinginthedark
Member
Member # 10933
Default  Posted: 2:29 AM, April 15th (Tuesday)

I have researched some companies for the best trasfer balance.
I am lookin for a good apr (I have one with a GOOD APR,LIKE 0% FOR 15 TO 18 MONTHS and opefully a good apr for the life of the loan like 3 or 4%)
no annual fee
no transfer balance fee
earns % off spending etc


Spent alot on detectives while what i needed in my casr was a good var and a vedeo surveillance system. Still need one


Posts: 606 | Registered: Jun 2006
notmyfairytale
Member
Member # 15348
Default  Posted: 2:54 PM, June 23rd (Monday)

Bumping this thread because we have several who need it. My offer still stands. I am availiable for help.


me- 30 FBS
him 38 FWS
MadHatter in my First M

Reconciled.

Proud member of the purple Dyson club.

Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it or play with it, pee on it and walk away.

Have you hugged your MOD today?


Posts: 1729 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: SC
Puppyb
Member
Member # 15226
Exclaimation  Posted: 10:29 AM, July 17th (Thursday)

Five Signs That You're Living Beyond Your Means

by Glenn Curtis
Monday, July 14, 2008

Many people in America are living beyond their means, as personal savings rates are at their lowest levels since the Great Depression, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. Dwindling savings mean that U.S. households are taking on more debt and are less able to absorb a financial blow like the loss of a job or a downturn in the economy.

If you are concerned that your finances could be in danger, there is a way to tell whether you're in over your head. This article will provide you with five key indicators to watch for. If you find that one or more of them apply to you, it is likely time to reevaluate your spending and work on a long-term financial plan. Recognizing the problem is the first step to finding a solution.

Sign No. 1 - Your Credit Score is Below 600
Credit bureaus keep track of your payment history, outstanding loan balances and legal judgments against you. They then use this information to compile a credit score that reflects your credit worthiness. The numerical rankings go from a low of 300 to high of 850. The higher the better. It's this score that lenders use to determine whether they'll grant a loan. In general, any credit score below 600 means that you are probably in over your head.

If you aren't sure what your credit score is, contact any of the major credit bureaus (TransUnion, Equifax, Experian) and have them send you a copy of your credit report. This document will tell you what the bureaus - and ultimately lenders and financial institutions - think of your finances.

Sign No. 2 - You are Saving Less Than 5%
In 2005, the average rate of personal savings was an astonishing -0.5%, according to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. That means that not only were we spending all of our income, but also that a good number of us were also dipping into personal savings. This was the worst savings rate that Americans have recorded since 1933 when it was -0.7% during the Great Depression. The rate has bounced back into positive territory, but in 2008, it still hadn't cracked 1%.

A savings rate below 5% means you could be in real danger of financial ruin if someone in your family were to have a medical emergency, or your family home were to burn to the ground. With savings this low, it likely means you wouldn't even have the money to pay the necessary insurance deductibles.
Ideally, everyone should try to save as much as they can, but in terms of targets, the rule most financial advisors suggest is 10% of your gross income. Beginning at age 30, if you were to save 10% of your $100,000 annual income in your 401(k), or $10,000 every year, and earn a rate of return of 5%, that money would grow to more than $900,000 by age 65.

Sign No. 3 - Your Credit Card Balances are Rising

If you are one of those people who pays only the minimum due on their credit card balance each month, or if you send in only a small contribution toward the principal balance, then you are most likely in over your head.
Ideally, you should only charge what you can pay off at the end of each month. When you can't afford to pay off the balance in its entirety, you should try to make at least some contribution toward the outstanding principal.

The importance of paying down credit card balances as soon as possible cannot be understated. A person with $5,000 in credit card debt that makes the minimum payment of just $200 per month will end up spending more than $8,000 and take almost 13 years to pay off that debt.

Sign No. 4 - More Than 28% of Income Goes To Your House

Calculate what percentage of your monthly income goes toward your mortgage, property taxes and insurance. If it's more than 28% of your gross income, then you are likely in over your head.

Why is 28% the magic number? Historically, conservative lenders have used the 28% threshold because their experience has told them that this is the rate at which the average person can get by, make their mortgage payments and still enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Certainly, some homeowners can get by spending a higher percentage on their homes, particularly if they cut back elsewhere, but it's a dangerous line to walk.

Sign No. 5 - Your Bills are Spiraling Out of Control
Buying on credit and paying by installment has become a national pastime. It's much easier to buy a new flatscreeen TV when the salesman breaks down the price in monthly installments. What's an extra $50 per month, right? The problem is that all of these bills start to add up, and you end up nickel and diming yourself into bankruptcy. If your monthly income is being sliced and diced to pay for dozens of unnecessary installment purchases and services, you are likely in over your head.

Lay out all of your monthly bills on your kitchen table, and go through them one by one. Do you have a cell phone bill, a PDA bill, an internet bill, a premium cable TV package, a satellite radio bill, and all of those other gadgets that generate countless monthly bills? Ask yourself whether each product or service is really necessary. For example, do you really need a 500-channel premium cable TV package, or would you really notice the difference if you had fewer channels (and paid less)?

Some of the best places to find savings include your telephone bills (cell and land line), your utility bills (turn off the lights, and don't run the air conditioning if nobody is home) and your entertainment expenses (you could stand to dine out less and to pack a lunch for work).

Bottom Line
As a nation, we are digging ourselves ever deeper into debt. To avoid becoming part of the gloomy bankruptcy and foreclosure statistics, it's important to measure your financial health regularly. The five signs presented here are not a death sentence; instead, they should be seen as symptoms that allow you to diagnose a problem before it gets worse.

[This message edited by Puppyb at 10:30 AM, July 17th (Thursday)]


My current love:-
http://blufiles.storage.live.com/y1perkrFH89ZT1rQyAs5Flq04xyZr004AJTaJkH9NmW_JBi-sm0FpPlTXr8atJSXWLK

Posts: 1556 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: Toronto, Canada
gibbonsrose
Member
Member # 16280
Default  Posted: 11:50 AM, October 1st (Wednesday)

Based on the latest economic news... thought this thread deserved a ^bump^.


Me - Befuckled
WH - Limber at limbo *sigh*

Posts: 5040 | Registered: Sep 2007 | From: mountain transplant
gibbonsrose
Member
Member # 16280
Default  Posted: 9:50 AM, October 2nd (Thursday)

From http://www.doughroller.net/2007/11/06/51-painless-money-saving-tips/:

Combine your cable, internet and telephone service. Companies now offer combined services that not only cost less, but offer the convenience of a single bill.

Slow down your internet service. I went to the slower internet service option with my cable company and saved $15 per month. And I haven’t noticed a difference when surfing the Net.

Send away for and follow up on rebates. After you buy a product with a rebate, send in the form that day. Then mark your calendar to remind yourself to follow up with the rebate company if the check hasn’t show up.

Buy a refurbished Mac: I’ve written about this before because it is a great way to buy not only computers, but iPods and iPhones as well. You can check out the details on how to buy a refurbished iPhone here.

Convert to a gas water heater. They are more efficient and will save you money in the long run.

Request a reduction in the interest rate for your home equity line of credit. I did and my mortgage company agreed to reduce the rate by more than 0.50%. And if you are looking for a home equity loan, LendingTree Home Equity Loans is a great place to check out available options.

Request a reduction in the interest rate on your credit cards. As with home equity loans, credit card companies sometimes are willing to reduce the interest rate. It can’t hurt to ask.

Refinance you mortgage. If you can reduce your interest rate by one percent or more, it is often beneficial to refinance. This is particularly true for those with high rates due to less than stellar credit scores. If your score has improved, you may qualify for a better rate. I would start by asking your current mortgage lender about lower rates. Here’s a refinance calculator to help you determine if refinancing is right for you.

Get rid of Private Mortgage Insurance. If your down payment was less than 20%, you are probably paying PMI. Once you have a 20% cushion through reducing your debt and home appreciation (yes, prices do go up from time to time), contact your mortgage company to start the process of removing the PMI.

Get your books from the library. I love books and read every day. While I buy some of the books I read, most come from the library. Simply put, it’s hard to beat free.

Get DVDs from the library. Many libraries now have movies on DVD that can be checked out. If your library offers this service, it sure beats paying Blockbuster or Netflix.

Get DVDs from Red Box. If your library doesn’t offer DVDs, get your moves from Red Box. It costs just one dollar per night. You find Red Box locations here.

Read magazines at the library or online. Too many magazines can cost a fortune. And how many times have you bought a magazine based on the cover and been disappointed by the lack of substance. At the library you can read magazines for free. And many magazines now offer their content for free online.

Subscribe to magazines that are must reads. If you must have a certain magazine each month, subscribe.

Subscriptions offer substantial savings over the cost at the newsstand. Update: Amazon offers some great deals on personal finance magazines.

Buy your car over the internet: Search the internet for information on the car you want and then send e-mail requests to dealers for the best price. Even if the dealer is located in another state, the cost to have the car delivered may still be worth it. I paid $500 to have a Honda Odyssey shipped 500 miles and still saved $1,000 over the best local price available.

Request a discount on trash service. For some reason this is a highly competitive business. If you get a better offer in the mail for trash service, call your current trash company and ask them to beat the offer. My trash service has reduced its rates twice in six months to match competing offers.

Never pay checking account fees. I hate bank fees. With so many free checking account plans available, there’s no reason to pay a fee. And if the bank happens to charge you one, ask them to reverse the fee or take your business to another bank.

Get a rewards card. There are many reward cards that pay out in cash or points that can be redeemed for travel or products. Many of these cards don’t have an annual fee. I recently traveled to my college reunion for free using points earned from a credit card. My favorite rewards card is American Express Gold Card. It does have an annual fee, although follow this link (American Express) to apply and the first year fee is waived. You can also check out my review of several travel reward credit cards.

Don’t pay interest on credit cards. This is obvious, but I soon as you fail to pay off the credit card in full, the high interest payments start to eat away at your monthly budget. If the temptation to spend more than you can pay on a credit card is to great, get rid of the credit card (and ignore the previous tip!).

Take advantage of 0% credit card offers. I’ve saved thousands of dollars using 0% balance transfer credit cards. Again, as long as the cards won’t cause you to spend more, they can offer substantial savings. Make sure, however, that you keep an eye on the balance transfer fee, which can wipe out your savings.

Replace incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent light (CFLs) bulbs. These bulbs use 75% less energy and last 10 times longer. They do take some getting used to, and they won’t work in every light fixture. But use them where it makes sense and save energy and money.

Drive your car longer. The buy new versus used debate often overlooks the most important factor–how long you own your car. Drive it as long as you safely can for substantial savings.

Pay your life insurance annually. Insurance companies charge you more if you pay monthly, quarterly or semi-annually. Pay once a year and you’ll pay less.

Pay car insurance semi-annually. At least with my car insurance, they offer quarterly and semi-annual payment options. It costs more to pay quarterly, and twice a year is more convenient anyway.

Increase insurance deductibles. Most of us don’t need to be insured for all losses over $100 on our car, for example. Although we wouldn’t want to pay a $250 or even $500 deductible, we could. If that’s you, find out how much you’d save from raising your deductible. I’ve raised my deductibles on my auto insurance and home owner’s insurance and saved a considerable amount.

Think before submitting an insurance claim. My rule of thumb is that I won’t submit a claim on a loss that is less than twice my deductible. So for a $250 deductible on an auto loss, I’ll pay out of pocket any loss up to $500. Why? The $250 I’d receive from my insurance company is not worth the increased premiums I’m likely to pay. You may want to call your insurance agent to find out how a claim will impact your premiums before filing the claim.

Get rid of your home telephone. This is a great way to save money. Many don’t do it because of the 911 service, and that’s understandable. But if you’re comfortable relying on a cell phone, there’s no reason to keep a land line. If you do, consider reducing your service to the minimum and only use the phone in an emergency.

Consider VOiP telephone service. We use Internet phone service and have saved substantial money over Verizon service. The phone service has been very reliable, and you’d never even know the signal was being carried over the Internet. Lingo is a great option for VOip telephone service, which costs just $21.95 a month for unlimited local and long distance calling in the U.S. and over 20 countries, and even gives you the first month of service for free (check out my Lingo Review).

Shut vents in unused rooms. This isn’t advisable if you have forced air heating, but shutting vents in unused rooms can save on your heating and cooling bill.

Eliminate some cable service. Note that I’m not recommending getting rid of cable completely, although that’s certainly a way to save money. If you must have cable, take a look at all the charges on your cable bill and consider getting rid of some of the service. Try it for a month and see if you really miss those last 500 channels.

Agree to limit gift giving. At Christmas our extended family and we go overboard when it comes to gift giving. Agree in advance to limit the gifts and save everybody some money.

Get healthy. Your health will directly impact the cost of life insurance and, in some cases, can reduce the cost of your health insurance.

Cancel the health club membership. Seems to contradict the previous tip, but evaluate how much you really use your health club. Less expensive options may include a gym at your work or a gym at your local parks and recreation center. Some offer pay as you go options rather than monthly fees, which can be great for those of us who aren’t as consistent in our routines as we’d like to be.

Pass on extended warranties. A $129 two year extension on a $300 product is just not worth it. Warranties are insurance, and we rarely need to insure such a small amount.

Take your lunch to work one more day a week than you do now. Eating out at lunch is fun, so I wouldn’t eliminate it completely. But taking lunch just one more day a week will keep money in your pocket.

Buy low cost mutual funds. This is easy to miss because the money doesn’t come out of your pocket each month. But keep an eye on the cost of the mutual funds in your 401(k) and other investments. My rule of thumb is that no fund should cost more than 1% and the combined cost for all your funds should be less than 0.50%. If you don’t believe that even a half percent can make a big difference, read this.

Take advantage of employer 401(k) matches. If your employer matches 401(k) contributions, do everything you can to take full advantage of that match.

Use flexible spending accounts. FSAs allow you to pay certain medical, dental and child care expenses using pre-tax dollars. If your not taking advantage of these accounts, you’re wasting money. Enrollment at many companies is occurring now, so check with your HR department if you have any questions about FSAs.

Get tires from Costco or other wholesale clubs. Simply put, they cost a lot less than buying them at the dealer or even a chain tire store.

Keep tires properly inflated. It keeps you safe and costs less on gas.

Stop smoking. Need I say more?

Drink less alcohol. It costs money and ads calories.

Buy term life insurance. Any other life insurance product is just not worth the extra cost.

Buy generic over-the-counter medicines. They are exactly the same as their branded counterparts and cost less.

Get organized and avoid missed payments. I’ve missed a payment or two because the bill got buried beneath a stack of papers. Get organized and avoid those late payment penalties. If you do miss a payment, call your creditor and ask to have the penalty removed. They’ll usually accommodate the request, at least the first time.

Buy online when it saves you money. I’ve used Amazon to buy more than just books. It sells just about anything and sometimes at substantial savings.

Consider MythTV PVR in replace of TiVo type services. I just ran across MythTV and am still investigating it. I pay $15 a month to my cable company for a DVR box and would love to save the money. If you’ve used MythTV, let us know how well it works. You can get more information about MythTV here.

Use Open Source software when possible. I use GIMP instead of Photoshop. GIMP is free; Photoshop ain’t.

Check the insulation in your home. Extra insulation can easily pay for itself in one or two years, and it helps save the environment, too.

Buy energy efficient appliances. Look for the Energy Star on appliances and consider the annual energy cost before buying. More efficient appliances cost more, but you make up the extra cost and then some over the life of the product.

Stay married. Yes, I did say 51 “painless” money-saving tips. Yes, I know that some marriages end because of abuse and other extreme circumstances. “Isn’t marriage about love”, you ask. Sometimes. “You don’t know my situation”, you say. True. But I lived through the emotional and financial pain of two divorces as a child, and I’ve been married to the same women for more than 19 years, so I know plenty. Am I telling you not to get a divorce? Of course not. I am telling you that divorce will wreck your finances and your spouse’s finances

[This message edited by gibbonsrose at 9:52 AM, October 2nd (Thursday)]


Me - Befuckled
WH - Limber at limbo *sigh*

Posts: 5040 | Registered: Sep 2007 | From: mountain transplant
hope4better
Member
Member # 14919
Default  Posted: 2:43 PM, October 2nd (Thursday)

Thanks gibbonsrose! This is very helpful and I need all the help I can get with winter coming.


Me: BW-35
Him: WH-35
Kids: 13 and 2yrs (both kids are his)
DDay #1: Summer of 1998 (ow#1)
DDay #2: Summer of 2003 (ow#2)
DDay #3: Summer of 2004 (ow#3)
DDay #4: Summer of 2005 (ow#4 21yr old) He kept this one
Married: 6yrs Divorced: 2007

Posts: 932 | Registered: Jun 2007 | From: midwest
wildbananas
Member
Member # 10552
Default  Posted: 1:56 PM, October 3rd (Friday)

Bump - just read through this and there is a lot of great advice!


Travel light, live light, spread the light, be the light. ~ Yogi Bhajan

Posts: 15279 | Registered: Apr 2006 | From: Just a Cali girl
UnbearablySadd
Member
Member # 18150
Default  Posted: 1:58 AM, October 5th (Sunday)

I was reading this thread, and wondered, is there anyway we can each share our typical expenses and ask for suggestions on how to cut back (Preparing for second divorce due to WH starting (apparently) ANOTHER A....).

I ask as a mom of three (from first marriage), and am unemployed.

I read all the articles, and have implemented many of the suggestions. With two kids not at home, cell phones are essential. Should I cut free texting out? It is about 60 a month, but is unlimited. It seems to be all the kids use and allows five of us to share 1400 minutes a month and never ever go over in five years. Thoughts?

Am committing to canceling:
1. land-line
2. Blockbuster movie rental account

Trying hard to:
1. reduce grocery bill.
2. Utility bills (even with auto set back thermostat my heat is almost as expensive as my mortgage).

Most of the other "typical" suggestions don't apply to me (no cable at all, no debt outside mortgage (I pay cc off in full every month), no life insurance, no car payment (I own a 1997 F 150, and my oldest actually has it in another state). MY WS owns and pays for the other cars - which he would take in a D).

I am trying to finish a grad degree in order to get employment. The first divorce took my entire savings, all I have is this house.

If anyone has suggestions for me, would love to hear them.

(and I am NOT a shopper).

Warmly,

US


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGQd8M5t4Ao&NR=1

it's all about James Hunter, now ;)

And here's the 180 link:
http://www.survivinginfidelity.com/forums.asp?tid=256092


Posts: 1379 | Registered: Feb 2008 | From: This side of R that side of S
hope4better
Member
Member # 14919
Default  Posted: 12:21 PM, October 7th (Tuesday)

Sorry I have no advice for you US but thought I'd bump this for you.


Me: BW-35
Him: WH-35
Kids: 13 and 2yrs (both kids are his)
DDay #1: Summer of 1998 (ow#1)
DDay #2: Summer of 2003 (ow#2)
DDay #3: Summer of 2004 (ow#3)
DDay #4: Summer of 2005 (ow#4 21yr old) He kept this one
Married: 6yrs Divorced: 2007

Posts: 932 | Registered: Jun 2007 | From: midwest
gibbonsrose
Member
Member # 16280
Default  Posted: 1:27 PM, October 7th (Tuesday)

A tip originally posted by PeacePower in another thread:

www.freecycle.org

"The Freecycle Network™ is made up of 4,612 groups with 5,899,000 members across the globe. It's a grassroots and entirely nonprofit movement of people who are giving (& getting) stuff for free in their own towns. It's all about reuse and keeping good stuff out of landfills."


Me - Befuckled
WH - Limber at limbo *sigh*

Posts: 5040 | Registered: Sep 2007 | From: mountain transplant
Puppyb
Member
Member # 15226
Exclaimation  Posted: 4:48 PM, October 13th (Monday)

10 (More) reasons why you are not rich

-----------------------------
http://finance.yahoo.com/banking-budgeting/article/105934/10-Reasons-You%27re-Not-Rich

[This message edited by Puppyb at 4:51 PM, October 13th (Monday)]


My current love:-
http://blufiles.storage.live.com/y1perkrFH89ZT1rQyAs5Flq04xyZr004AJTaJkH9NmW_JBi-sm0FpPlTXr8atJSXWLK

Posts: 1556 | Registered: Jul 2007 | From: Toronto, Canada
letting_go
Member
Member # 13774
Default  Posted: 8:40 PM, October 19th (Sunday)

How to survive on $2000 a month, after taxes.

Rent/Mortgage: $600-$800

Mortgage gets paid before anything else.

Utilities(gas/electric/water): $200-$250

If possible collect rain water to water plants or wash vehicle, etc...

Extras (basic cable, phone): $75-$100

Food (always use coupons from the internet, Sunday paper, local store) for family of 4 or more: $200-$300 a month.

You can save on food by buying meat and bread from the grocery when you purchase meat on the last day the store can carry it and use it for dinner that night. Buy bread from the bakery instead of the grocery store.

Clothing($50 per person per month): $50-$200

Consignment shops and yard sales are great places to stretch a buck.

Buy winter clothes in the summer. Buy summer clothes when it's cold.

Credit Cards: If you have a shopping compulsion and need to pay off your credit cards ask the cc company to deactivate your account or write them a letter to cancel the card. Pay off the highest interest rate card first and put the most amount of money on that card.

Family fun: Check out a FREE movie from the library. Find the FREE family activities in your area. Volunteer to be a chaperone for your kids fieldtrips. Volunteer at festivals, concerts, games,etc...

Car payment: $200-$300 with a warranty for at least the motor/transmission.

Trade vehicle in for the smallest and most fuel efficient vehicle your family can use.

Carpool or take public transportation to work. Do a carpool with other parents to take your kids to school and/or extracurricular activities such as sports.

I hope this helps.


"To change and to improve are two different things."
Anonymous. German proverb.

"It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men." Frederick Douglass (1818-1895)


Posts: 3704 | Registered: Feb 2007
SRVfan38
Member
Member # 19338
Default  Posted: 11:32 PM, October 19th (Sunday)

Thanks all, this really has some great tips. Some I am already doing, some I can't do and some I will give a try.

One thing I do that I didn't see mentioned (maybe I missed cause sometimes I'm blind) I make up a meal planner each week. I write down at least 7 meals plus whatever else we need and I stick with the list unless I truely forgot something we need. Before hitting the store, I ask everyone if there is anything they need cause I'm doing grocery shopping. Some weeks are tighter than others and I try to go as cheap as possible with the meals. Like replacing chicken thighs with chicken breasts. Using round steak for fajitas instead of skirt steak. Just a few suggestions.


I want to become the person my dogs think I am.

Posts: 265 | Registered: Apr 2008 | From: Wannabe in Tahiti
SRVfan38
Member
Member # 19338
Default  Posted: 10:18 AM, October 20th (Monday)

I also wanted to add a couple of other tips.

Don't get a pet. You have to consider vet bills, shots, meds, food. Also if the animal gets sick, the vet bills can sky rocket. If you already have an animal, don't get rid of it, but shop around for meds. I have found absolutelypets.com has the cheapest heart worm meds. Also going with Interceptor instead of Heart Guard is a little more expensive, but I learned the hard way, it will save you in the long run. Interceptor guards against hookworm and whipworm, Heart Guard does not. If your pet gets either hookworm or whipworm you have to get more meds to go through the deworming process which can be expensive. If you absolutely feel you need a pet for your well being, look at rescues. Usually they make sure animals have been spay or nuetured before adopting out which will save on having the surgery. Also, if you use sheets or blankets for your animal, look at garage sales for those. I hit an estate sale, they were just throwing some away thinking they couldn't sell them, I got a stack of old sheets free for my dogs.

Night cream-if you like using one. I have found Crisco works excellent as a night cream. It's super cheap. I've also heard that vasoline works just as good. No, it doesn't make your face break out either. Wash with soap and put on a thin layer of crisco (or off brand) and wash off the next morning.

It has saved me a lot to buy in bulk as well. I did see that mentioned. I do go to Sam's, but!!!! you really have to watch what you buy, it's not always the cheapest. Toilet paper, laundry detergent, dishwashing soap, things like that are usually cheap, but some of the grocery items are not any cheaper than Walmart or the grocery store.

Make up. I'm discovering that some of the make up bought at Walmart or the drug stores do not last as long. They seem to fall apart and flake. Look for sales at Dillards, Von Mar, ect. Take advantage of those sales. You pay a little more, but the make up lasts much, much longer than the cheaper stuff. I got just a sample of Este Lauder mascara, very small one with the purchase of eye liner and the sample has lasted a whole year. Have not even used half of the eye liner. I'm finally running low on the mascara. I know this does not apply to men.

Look for sales!!! Garage sales are great. Just spent $50 over the weekend on a ton of clothes for my daughter at my neighbors garage sale. My daughter is set for at least a year. I saw something mentioned about buying summer clothes in the winter and winter clothes in the summer. Most of the time that works.

OH, and one last thing. If you drink sodas, avoid going to the local gas station or soda machine for that. Buy the 12 or 24 packs, way cheaper, but that one is a no brainer.

Just a few every day tips that I have discovered through experience.


I want to become the person my dogs think I am.

Posts: 265 | Registered: Apr 2008 | From: Wannabe in Tahiti
gibbonsrose
Member
Member # 16280
Default  Posted: 12:15 PM, December 9th (Tuesday)

The Christmas crunch is upon us.

Does anyone have tips for Christmas shopping? As in, coupons, great deals you've found at specific stores, gift ideas, etc?


Me - Befuckled
WH - Limber at limbo *sigh*

Posts: 5040 | Registered: Sep 2007 | From: mountain transplant
Pippy
Member
Member # 16482
Default  Posted: 9:49 AM, July 19th (Sunday)

This thread has been idle a long time so I am bumping it.

My money saving tip?
If you are apartment hunting, and live where there is a Winter season, pick an apartment that is surrounded (someone on each side and upstairs and down) Avoid the first floor/basement for this reason. I rarely have to turn my heat on. The neighbors pay my heating bill.


I divorced him because I didn't like his girlfriend.
M 30 yrs.


Posts: 9584 | Registered: Oct 2007 | From: East of the Rockies
PixieDust
Member
Member # 21842
Default  Posted: 5:15 AM, August 6th (Thursday)

Bumping

And....to bring up Dave Ramsey's The Total Money Makeover b/c its done wonders for me and Mr Pixie and our finances. We dont follow everything he says, but just half way following it has been really good for us. If you havent read his book, I highly recommend it.

A lot of it is common sense. But I guess Mr Pixie and I were sort of lacking in that. Probably why we ended up at SI in the first place.


Me(38): FWW/BW
Him(33): FBH/WH
Married: 6 years
DD(2), DS (8mo)DS in heaven
Status: Learning a bunch of new letters: SA, SAA, CSAT and COSA. How fun.

Posts: 150 | Registered: Nov 2008 | From: Texas
Hope4TheFuture
Member
Member # 25382
Default  Posted: 5:22 PM, September 8th (Tuesday)

A great website is consumerist.com

I fund my "fun" stuff with my "$5.00 Bill Savings Account". Any time I get a $5.00 in change, I throw it in a drawer. When I have $100, I bundle it and put it in a strong box. You'd be surprised how fast it adds up and you then have some cash on hand if you have an emergency.

Hope4


Posts: 604 | Registered: Sep 2009 | From: in the void
dreamlife
Member
Member # 8142
Default  Posted: 12:43 AM, September 15th (Tuesday)

Using indoor/outdoor clotheslines saves your clothing and $350 + each year.


~XWH told me what I wanted to hear but he always did whatever he wanted to do~

Posts: 25351 | Registered: Sep 2005
Pioneer
Member
Member # 25287
Content  Posted: 2:11 PM, October 31st (Saturday)

[This message edited by Pioneer at 11:17 PM, October 31st (Saturday)]


Divorced 1st wife after the dumbass left her "cheating journal" out, after I returned from Desert Storm. Piss on her and good ridance, I'm done.

Posts: 185 | Registered: Aug 2009 | From: West Virginia
NewAttitude
Member
Member # 1030
Default  Posted: 3:03 PM, October 31st (Saturday)

I'm available for helping if anyone needs pointers to begin grocery couponing.

Through my use of coupons my family's grocery bill has been cut down to $200 a month. That is for four people and a dog.

I've posted my good bargains from time to time but if anyone needs specific help or pointers let me know.


Pain is inevitable; suffering is optional.

Posts: 58732 | Registered: Jan 2003
Pioneer
Member
Member # 25287
Default  Posted: 3:17 PM, October 31st (Saturday)

NA,

Seriously?!

How......is that possible?


Divorced 1st wife after the dumbass left her "cheating journal" out, after I returned from Desert Storm. Piss on her and good ridance, I'm done.

Posts: 185 | Registered: Aug 2009 | From: West Virginia
NewAttitude
Member
Member # 1030
Default  Posted: 3:21 PM, October 31st (Saturday)

I arranged with my local paper to get a deal on Sunday papers if I bought multiple copies.
I get four copies of the Sunday paper delievered to me for the cost of two. My MIL also saves her Sunday paper for me.
That gives me five copies of all the coupons every week.
Plus I print a lot off the internet.

I wait and match the coupons to whatever store is having the best sale and then I stock up by buying multiples.

I don't buy using a menu for the week...I buy using what's on sale and then I make my menu around that.

I usually don't even have to pay for things like toothpaste and deoderant. There's always a high value coupon to be found.


Pain is inevitable; suffering is optional.

Posts: 58732 | Registered: Jan 2003
Pioneer
Member
Member # 25287
Default  Posted: 3:38 PM, October 31st (Saturday)

Very interesting.

Thank you for sharing.


Divorced 1st wife after the dumbass left her "cheating journal" out, after I returned from Desert Storm. Piss on her and good ridance, I'm done.

Posts: 185 | Registered: Aug 2009 | From: West Virginia
TwiceTorn
Member
Member # 13895
Default  Posted: 4:13 PM, October 31st (Saturday)

Wow great thread!

Things I would suggest for home improvement projects is going to the Re-Store. http://www.habitat.org/env/restores.aspx

You can get some amazing deals on home improvement stuff thats overstocked. I tiled my front entry for less then $20.


You've got to trust your instinct
And let go of regret
You've got to bet on yourself now star
'Cause that's your best bet~311 All mixed up


Posts: 3597 | Registered: Mar 2007 | From: Minnesota
mellowmood
Member
Member # 2097
Default  Posted: 5:23 PM, October 31st (Saturday)

Pioneer -

I would like to hear your views on the stock market. I'm a novice and just now starting to think about investing.


Posts: 2755 | Registered: Aug 2003 | From: oceanside, calif.
Queen Esther
New Member
Member # 25977
Default  Posted: 6:39 PM, October 31st (Saturday)

I wash all of my clothes in cold water. Saves on energy as well as my clothes.
Queen of Hot Flashes here so my thermostat is set to 64. I wear slippers and long sleeves until bedtime. My bedroom upstairs is about 68-68...one thermostat to control the whole house. I've made sure my insulation is good and plastic the one window that leaks. I keep lights off when not needed and use candles. Love the ambiance, they add to the heat and lighting. I buy inexpensive candles from Wal-Mart. With the except of liquid makeup and mascara, my makeup is the off-brands. I cook from scratch, even if it's just me, freezing the extras for quick dinners. Then if I don't feel like cooking or am running late, I don't rely on fast food.


Happily Divorced & living alone for the first time in my life. Have a wonderful SO who is one of my best friends. Love is friendship set on fire. - French Proverb


Posts: 45 | Registered: Oct 2009 | From: Walking on the East coast with my toes in the sea
latebloomer45
Member
Member # 18021
Default  Posted: 7:01 PM, October 31st (Saturday)

See if your library has "The Tightwad Gazette". Although 20 years old the author still has some excellent points. She was feeding 8 people for under $200 per month in 1995. You don't have to be as extreme as her but she WILL get you thinking about things differently.


Me: BS 50
Him: FWS 52
Married 26 years
Son-20, Daughter-17,
D-Day #1 12/11/2007
D-Day #2 5/23/2008 fucking trickle truth!
Whatever Threnody said, I concur.


Posts: 2066 | Registered: Feb 2008 | From: Chicago suburbs
Pioneer
Member
Member # 25287
Default  Posted: 11:38 AM, November 1st (Sunday)

Pioneer -
I would like to hear your views on the stock market. I'm a novice and just now starting to think about investing.

We have had a 5.92% correction on the S & P since its 1098 high. Most everyone is expecting a 7-10% correction before consolidation.

So, worst case scenario, a 10% decline brings us to SP 988, call it 990.

I don't believe that we'll see a retracement to last year's levels. Just a correction, since the market ran almost 50% from it's March 09 low. Without any real gap filling.

So, if you have had money sitting on the sidelines, waiting for a entry point, then this may be your last opportunity to invest on the cheap, for future high potential gains.

There are some great companies that are on sale right now.

If you do decide to invest, always do your Due Dilligence on any company that you plan to invest in.

This includes:

1. Reading all current year SEC filings

2. Reading the past four Conference Calls, which is commonly referred to as the quaterly reports.

3. Google the company for any news. Do they have any lawsuits pending, any positive news or negative neew. This will affect the pps.

4. Go to a financial page, such as Fox, CNN, Yahoo, etc... and pull up the year to date charts for the company that you're interested in. Print them off and study them. When you become more comfortable with these charts, add the 50 day Simple Moving Average, the 200 day Simple Moving Average, and the MACD indicator with 10 day SMA. These three tools, will help you determine a entry point and a exit point in your company.

5. When you have finally found a company that you're interested in, DO NOT buy all in at once. Average your buy positions with 1/3 or better yet 1/4 entry points. You may be buying shares at a lower or higher price than your first purchase. That's ok. This is why it is called averaging in.

6. Have patience! I cannot stress this enough... You may get lucky and with your first comapny, you may see a upward trend in the price per share (pps), or the pps may delcine. Too many people lose their asses in the market by stressing out and selling when the pps goes down. Stocks fluctuate. If you have done all of your DD and are sure of your company, then you should not have anything to worry about.

7. NEVER PUT ALL OF YOUR MONEY INTO ONE SECURITY!!!!

This is a receipe for disaster. Always diversify with other companies in other sectors.

What would happen if you put $2000 into a company and the pps went down? You'd be on the losing side of a trade.

Now take $1k put it into A company and the othe 1k put that into B comapny in another sector.

Now if A company goes down some and B company goes up some, then you still have a porfoilo that is making money.

But remember, never buy in all at once. Buy in 1/4 positions, so with this one, you would take $250 for each company and buy in at different entry points.

8. For first timers, look into blue chip companies.

There is nothing wrong with buying into a company such as General Mills, John & Johnson, Coca Cola, McDonald's, etc...

These are names that have been around forever and will liely to stay around forever. Most, if not all pay a dividend (interest) on your investment.

9. Cheap companies are cheap for a reason.

I always do extra DD when I look at a company whose pps is less than $2. To me this is the first sign that this might be a distressed company. So, I'm doing extra digging.

Cheap companies, such as bio tech, usually do not have a market ready product. They mainly rely on hype on a new drug that they are developing. Can they pay off? yes. Can you lose your ass? yes. Companies, such as bio-tech are pure speculation. Gambling...if you will. If you decide to go this route, be prepared to lose, because most likely that you will.

10. Do not invest on anyone's advice!

Do your own homework. Cramer and all of the other talking heads on CNBC, are jackasses.

They are good for entertainment and gathering ideas from different sectors.

Never buy anything that they recommend.

If they say buy and you already own it, sell.

If they say sell and you are thinking about that company, get ready to buy.

Notice how I never once mentioned one real company? I don't want you to invest in my companies, based on my say so.

I'll give anyone ideas on sectors that I invest in, wher I made money. And I will throw out several companies in that sector that I'm invested in. One may be the company that I have in that particular sector.

Then it will be up to you, to do your own DD and make the decision that's best for you.

Take your time to study, read books, charts, anything that you can get your hands on.

I can recommend a fantastic book, that you can pick up on ebay or Barnes and Noble, but I'll not put the title out on here. PM me if you're interested and I'll provide with it.

Remember that smart investors, who are informed and know what to do when, will always win in any economy. Even in this one.

peace.

[This message edited by Pioneer at 2:47 PM, November 29th (Sunday)]


Divorced 1st wife after the dumbass left her "cheating journal" out, after I returned from Desert Storm. Piss on her and good ridance, I'm done.

Posts: 185 | Registered: Aug 2009 | From: West Virginia
Pioneer
Member
Member # 25287
Default  Posted: 1:15 AM, November 22nd (Sunday)

bump


Divorced 1st wife after the dumbass left her "cheating journal" out, after I returned from Desert Storm. Piss on her and good ridance, I'm done.

Posts: 185 | Registered: Aug 2009 | From: West Virginia
dreamlife
Member
Member # 8142
Default  Posted: 11:38 PM, February 5th (Saturday)

bump~


~XWH told me what I wanted to hear but he always did whatever he wanted to do~

Posts: 25351 | Registered: Sep 2005
UR_AN_IDIOT
Member
Member # 18764
Default  Posted: 7:27 PM, September 1st (Saturday)

Bump


Me:BW 48
FWH: 50

Married 25 years
DD 23 DS 21
Reconciled


Posts: 12696 | Registered: Mar 2008
wifehad5
Moderator
Member # 15162
Default  Posted: 12:37 PM, March 5th (Tuesday)

Bump


FBH - 42
FWW - 43 (BrokenRoad)
2 kids 7&12

The people you do your life with shape the life you live


Posts: 35354 | Registered: Jun 2007 | From: Michigan
million pieces
Member
Member # 27539
Default  Posted: 6:52 PM, March 5th (Tuesday)

Ok, I'm starting all over after my D. I got the house, a tiny Roth that was in my name, that is it. I did Dave Ramsey's money management guide years ago when I took over my family's finances, it worked well for me. I've looked at it again, I am on Step 4? Retirement, goal 15%. I have 14% at work (10% me, 4% in matching). Both my Roth and 401K are with Vanguard, but different funds. I'd like to do the last 1% in my Roth, but should everything be w Vanguard. Would another fund be ok? Should I do another group (TRowePrice?)

And then on to saving for college...


Me - 42
2 kids, 9 and 11
D-Day 2/5/10, separated 3 wks later
Divorced 11/15/11!!!!

Posts: 1149 | Registered: Feb 2010 | From: MD
Crescita
Member
Member # 32616
Default  Posted: 1:21 PM, March 6th (Wednesday)

Millionpieces, I think if you are more likely to manage your funds all in one place, it might be better to stick with Vanguard, but this is from someone who has just started saving for retirement and is only concerned with diversifying within one account.

I am currently in a long term relationship and trying to double down on efforts to improve MY funds before they become US funds.

I have ~40k in student loans at 5.125% interest and ~11k in Roth. Instinct is to get rid of the student loans as they will follow me for the next 15 years, but they already take up 13% of my income while I just recently upped my Roth contribution to 5% (no match). Also I would like to start saving for 20% down on a house (short sale after D, don’t want to touch being upside down, high payments or PMI again)

How do you think I should prioritize the 3 goals? My afraid of a second D self thinks I should prioritize student loans, retirement, house fund, but if I put aside those reservations it makes more sense to focus on retirement, house, and then student loans.


Posts: 2967 | Registered: Jun 2011 | From: The Valley of the Sun
PlainsGirl29
Member
Member # 33520
Default  Posted: 5:01 PM, March 9th (Saturday)

I like Dave ramsey but the econmides have a book "Americas cheapest family" that I love.

Right now I am so Bummed this D is going to put me in debt via going back to college. I know I got out pretty easily financially from the divorce but taking grad classes is not cheap!

I have paid down about 1100$ in cc debt since the D finalized. I am sitting on a.cushion of a bit over 1 months expenses in savings, so I am doing ok. I still need to pay off 1200$ in cc. I also have about 4400$ in student loans but I am not worrying about paying them off right away.

I shop sales, budget like my life depends on it, buy most dds clothes from the thrift shops.


Posts: 1146 | Registered: Oct 2011
2kidsandadog
Member
Member # 33679
Default  Posted: 8:38 PM, March 16th (Saturday)

If you are lucky enough to have a Dollar Tree or something of that nature, I find that I can buy lots of my personal hygiene items there i.e. body wash, conditioner,shampoo, razors, etc...

I buy cards and gift bags there as well.

Some things I won't compromise on but I have found that some things there are cheap and not worth the money, other things make a $50.00 grocery store run around $15-$20.00.

Also, I shop at thrift stores for my office wardrobe and have received many compliments on some of my clothes.


Divorced 05/11/11 -
2kids - 20 and 22 (Thank God for them)

Too many Ddays to count. Enough said!


Posts: 693 | Registered: Oct 2011
doggiediva
Member
Member # 33806
Default  Posted: 3:17 PM, April 19th (Friday)

I really like this thread...Lots of good info :)


Don't tie your happiness to the tail of somebody else's kite

Posts: 794 | Registered: Nov 2011
doggiediva
Member
Member # 33806
Default  Posted: 3:39 PM, April 19th (Friday)

Some of the upscale thrift shops around Houston have gently used designer clothes/home goods that would cost hundreds of dollars new but sell for way less than 100 dollars in their present condition..A fav way for me to find accessories, shirts/blouses, art when I have $25.00-$50.00 to spend :)


Don't tie your happiness to the tail of somebody else's kite

Posts: 794 | Registered: Nov 2011
torn2bits
Member
Member # 28376
Default  Posted: 9:56 PM, April 19th (Friday)

Some other things that may not have been mentioned here.

If you learn how to do some things yourself you can save money.

A long time ago when I was younger, my MIL taught me a few things and my grandmother.

I know how to sew, crochet and cut hair.

I have 2 sons and I have cut their hair since they were born. Hair cuts; the way their hair grows can be over $60 for both with the tip. I bought the expert razors and sprays to keep them sharp from the beauty supply store.

Also, if they need a new scarf or hat, I get the skeins of yarn on sale for like 89 cents per skein and crochet them a new one.

I also repair all of their clothes with my sewing machine. I sew new pillow cases with the fabric from the flat sheets we do not use.

Seeds to have your own vegetable garden are so cheap. The return is amazing when you harvest all those vegetables.

My children are purposely not able to have the latest fad. I believe when you start that stuff young then they expect it. I know some of their friends have iphones at 10 years old. This is ridiculous to me.

To save gas and bus fare, they ride their bikes or walk to school. Scouting is a wonderful avenue to provide inexpensive activities for families at a discount.

I bring snacks, water bottles to every event. When we go to the zoo, I pack a lunch and we carry it around with us.

We are lucky to have a free zoo here. The museums also have free days and the library affords free passes with your library card for all the museums.

Those cleaning supplies can really add up. I looked online for more natural ways to clean my house and found vinegar, which is cheaper than some of those cleaners and a few drops of bleach in a spray bottle with water does the trick. A gallon of bleach is much less expensive then different cleaners.

I don't buy soda. My kids are only allowed drink tea, water or milk. Soda is very expensive and they can only have it if we go out to eat on a special occasion.

We eat lots of chicken because its cheap and filling.

Paper towels are very nice, but they cost money. I have hand towels and rags and I just wash them.

I don't buy storage bags because I reuse the rubbermaid type containers and clean them in the dishwasher and soak with bleach.

Real dishes and glasses can be cleaned thoroughly and reused again and again. No paper plates.

Also, I look at people who I know are making a alot less money but can still feed their family of 6. I just see how wasteful we can be sometimes.
Just some thoughts.


Me: 44/WH (SA): 49
M: 24 years 3 kids over 10 yrs old
EA/ PA Dec. 2009 -Divorce pending

Posts: 1240 | Registered: Apr 2010 | From: Midwest
Topic Posts: 79